skip to content
A preliminary survey of the bats of the Deerlodge National Forest Montana : 1991 Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

A preliminary survey of the bats of the Deerlodge National Forest Montana : 1991

Author: Thomas W Butts; Montana Natural Heritage Program.; Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest (Agency : U.S.)
Publisher: Helena, Mont. : Montana Natural Heritage Program, [©1993]
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Six species of bats, representing four genera, were documented by capture during this phase of the study. These were the Big brown bat, (Eptesicus fuscus), the Little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus), the Yuma bat (Myotis yumanensis), the Long-eared myotis (Myotis evotis), the Hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and the Silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). Relative bat densities varied between habitats. Those with  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

We were unable to get information about libraries that hold this item.

Details

Genre/Form: Surveys
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas W Butts; Montana Natural Heritage Program.; Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest (Agency : U.S.)
OCLC Number: 291223527
Notes: Cover title.
"Final report, September 1993."
Description: 35 leaves : charts, forms, map ; 28 cm.
Other Titles: Bats of the Deerlodge National Forest
Responsibility: by Thomas W. Butts for the U.S.D.A. Forest Service, Deerlodge National Forest.

Abstract:

Six species of bats, representing four genera, were documented by capture during this phase of the study. These were the Big brown bat, (Eptesicus fuscus), the Little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus), the Yuma bat (Myotis yumanensis), the Long-eared myotis (Myotis evotis), the Hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and the Silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). Relative bat densities varied between habitats. Those with rock-outcrops, beaver ponds, mature hardwoods, mature Douglas fir, or riparian areas nearby had the greatest bat activity. Findley (1993) stated that an increase in species richness accompanies increased availability of roosts. "Forested regions lacking cliffs, caverns, and caves support fewer species, and those that do occur are known to use trees as daytime roosts in summer. Mountains, broken topography with opportunities for roosting in crevices, cliff faces, caverns, and caves support richer communities" (Findley, 1993). Management prescriptions that maintain undisturbed stand of old-growth forest, especially stands of Douglas fir and mature hardwoods, the maintenance of healthy riparian area, and the preservation of caves and access to abandoned mine adits will provide roosting and foraging habitat for a diversity and abundance of bats. Management activities that promote large lodgepole pine stands, and even-aged management will not.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/291223527>
library:oclcnum"291223527"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/291223527>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
<http://viaf.org/viaf/156152205>
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest (Agency : U.S.)"
schema:copyrightYear"1993"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1993"
schema:description"Six species of bats, representing four genera, were documented by capture during this phase of the study. These were the Big brown bat, (Eptesicus fuscus), the Little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus), the Yuma bat (Myotis yumanensis), the Long-eared myotis (Myotis evotis), the Hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and the Silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). Relative bat densities varied between habitats. Those with rock-outcrops, beaver ponds, mature hardwoods, mature Douglas fir, or riparian areas nearby had the greatest bat activity. Findley (1993) stated that an increase in species richness accompanies increased availability of roosts. "Forested regions lacking cliffs, caverns, and caves support fewer species, and those that do occur are known to use trees as daytime roosts in summer. Mountains, broken topography with opportunities for roosting in crevices, cliff faces, caverns, and caves support richer communities" (Findley, 1993). Management prescriptions that maintain undisturbed stand of old-growth forest, especially stands of Douglas fir and mature hardwoods, the maintenance of healthy riparian area, and the preservation of caves and access to abandoned mine adits will provide roosting and foraging habitat for a diversity and abundance of bats. Management activities that promote large lodgepole pine stands, and even-aged management will not."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/172915447>
schema:genre"Surveys"
schema:genre"Surveys."
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"A preliminary survey of the bats of the Deerlodge National Forest Montana : 1991"
schema:name"Bats of the Deerlodge National Forest"
schema:publisher
schema:url

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.