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Presentation of data in science : publications, slides, posters, overhead projectors, tape-slides, television : principles and practices for authors and teachers

Author: Linda Reynolds
Publisher: The Hague ; Boston : Nijhoff, 1982.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Linda Reynolds
ISBN: 9789024730544 9024730546
OCLC Number: 33949237
Description: xxii, 209 p. : ill.
Contents: 1. The legibility of type.- 1.1. Introduction.- 1.2. Investigating legibility.- 1.2.1. The reading process.- 1.2.2. Methods of research.- 1.3. Type forms.- 1.3.1. The basic anatomy of type.- 1.3.2. Typeface.- 1.3.3. Type weight.- 1.3.4. Italics.- 1.3.5. Capitals versus lower case.- 1.3.6. Numerals.- 1.4. Type size.- 1.5. Line length.- 1.6. Line spacing.- 1.7. Letter and word spacing.- 1.8. Justified versus unjustified setting.- 1.9. Margins.- 1.10. Single- versus double-column layouts.- 1.11. Paper and ink.- 2. The presentation of text.- 2.1. The visual representation of information 'structure'.- 2.2. Continuous text.- 2.2.1. Headings.- 2.2.2. Paragraphs.- 2.3. Bibliographies and references.- 2.4. Indexes.- 3. The presentation of tables.- 3.1. Structure.- 3.2. Layout and typography.- 3.2.1. General principles.- 3.2.2. Horizontal emphasis.- 3.2.3. Vertical emphasis.- 3.2.4. Headings.- 3.2.5. Lettering.- 4. The presentation of graphs, charts and diagrams.- 4.1. The relative merits of different kinds of illustration.- 4.2. The content of illustrations.- 4.3. General principles of presentation.- 4.3.1. Layout.- 4.3.2. Framing.- 4.3.3. Visual emphasis.- 4.4. The presentation of graphs and charts.- 4.4.1. Data points.- 4.4.2. Standard errors.- 4.4.3. Lines linking data points.- 4.4.4. Scale calibrations.- 4.4.5. Axes.- 4.4.6. Labelling of axes.- 4.4.7. Keys.- 4.4.8. Headings.- 5. Printed publications.- 5.1. Introduction.- 5.2. Graphic standards for graphs, charts and diagrams in printed journals.- 5.2.1. Instructions to authors.- 5.2.2. Reproduction ratios.- 5.2.3. Size of drafts and artwork.- 5.2.4. Formulae.- A. Capital letter height.- B. Line thickness.- C. Space between ruled lines.- D. Dot diameter.- 5.2.5. Character style.- 5.2.6. Character spacing.- 5.2.7. Space between lines of text.- 5.2.8. Tones and shading.- 5.2.9. Positive versus negative images.- 5.2.10. Contrast.- 5.2.11. Oversize artwork for publication.- 5.2.12. Compatibility with standards for slides.- 5.3. Guide lines for camera-ready copy.- 5.3.1. Copy for journals or proceedings of meetings.- 5.3.2. Copy for reports.- 5.4. Original artwork versus copies.- 5.4.1. Reasons for copying artwork.- 5.4.2. Copying methods.- 5.5. Overlays and cover sheets.- 5.6. Marks of identification.- 5.7. Sending artwork to the publisher or printer.- 6. Slides.- 6.1. Introduction.- 6.2. Planning a slide presentation.- 6.2.1. The use of 'introduction' and 'conclusion' slides.- 6.2.2. The body of the presentation.- 6.2.3. Constructing a story-board.- 6.2.4. Rehearsal.- 6.3. The content of slides.- 6.3.1. Word slides.- 6.3.2. Data slides.- 6.3.3. Headings for data slides.- 6.4. Graphic standards for slides.- 6.4.1. Originals.- 6.4.2. Slide formats.- 6.4.3. Size of drafts and artwork.- 6.4.4. Line thickness.- 6.4.5. Character height.- 6.4.6. Character style.- 6.4.7. Character spacing.- 6.4.8. Layout for word slides.- 6.4.9. Tones and shading.- 6.4.10. Positive versus negative images.- 6.4.11. Contrast.- 6.5. The use of colour.- 6.5.1. Black-and-white versus coloured artwork.- 6.5.2. The use of coloured images.- 6.5.3. The use of coloured backgrounds with black lettering.- 6.6. Testing slides.- 6.7. Projection of slides.- 6.8. The design of lecture theatres.- 7. Posters.- 7.1. Introduction.- 7.2. The content of posters.- 7.2.1. General principles.- 7.2.2. The structure of the poster.- 7.2.3. Headings.- 7.3. Useful equipment for poster production.- 7.4. Graphic standards for posters.- 7.4.1. Poster formats.- 7.4.2. Size of drafts and artwork.- 7.4.3. Character height.- 7.4.4. Character style.- 7.4.5. Layout for text.- 7.4.6. Illustrations.- 7.4.7. Poster layout.- 7.4.8. The use of colour.- 7.5. Packing and transporting poster displays.- 8. Overhead projection transparencies.- 8.1. Introduction.- 8.2. Graphic standards for transparencies.- 8.2.1. Originals.- 8.2.2. Format and size.- 8.2.3. Line thickness.- 8.2.4. Character height.- 8.2.5. Layout.- 8.2.6. The use of colour.- 8.3. Techniques in the use of OHP transparencies.- 8.3.1. Overlays.- 8.3.2. Reveals.- 8.3.3. Masking.- 8.4. Testing OHP transparencies.- 9. Tape-slide programmes.- 9.1. Introduction.- 9.2. Planning a tape-slide programme.- 9.3. Writing the script.- 9.4. Graphic standards.- 9.5. The recording.- 10. Television.- 10.1 Introduction.- 10.2. Graphic standards for television.- 10.2.1. Format.- 10.2.2. Size of drafts and artwork.- 10.2.3. Line thickness.- 10.2.4. Character height.- 10.2.5. Tones and shading.- 10.2.6. Contrast.- 10.2.7. The use of colour.- 11. Materials, equipment and working comfort.- 11.1. Introduction.- 11.2. Basic essentials for black-and-white artwork.- 11.2.1. Paper.- 11.2.2. Pencils.- 11.2.3. Inks.- 11.2.4. Pens.- 11.2.5. Rulers and set squares.- 11.2.6. Templates and stencils.- 11.2.7. Erasers.- 11.2.8. Scalpels.- 11.2.9. Burnishers.- 11.2.10. Adhesives.- 11.2.11. Drafting tape.- 11.2.12. Drawing boards.- 11.3. Other useful items for black-and-white artwork.- 11.3.1. Self-adhesive tapes.- 11.3.2. Dry-transfer symbols and lettering.- 11.3.3. Tone sheets.- 11.3.4. 'Pounce' powder.- 11.3.5. Fixatives and varnishes.- 11.4. Additional materials for colour and OHP work.- 11.4.1. Self-adhesive colour sheets.- 11.4.2. Paints.- 11.4.3. Brushes.- 11.4.4. Cells and foils (acetate sheets).- 11.5. Working comfort.- 11.5.1. Organisation.- 11.5.2. Furniture.- 11.5.3. Lighting.- 12. Basic techniques.- 12.1. Care and preparation of paper.- 12.2. Ink work.- 12.2.1. Use of technical drawing pens.- 12.2.2. Blotting.- 12.2.3. Drawing ink lines.- 12.2.4. Finishing-off ink lines.- 12.2.5. Use of templates and stencils.- 12.2.6. Short cuts.- 12.3. Correcting errors in ink work.- 12.3.1. General comments.- 12.3.2. Cut-and-stick corrections.- 12.3.3. Edge-crossing.- 12.3.4. Correcting with a knife.- 12.3.5. Correcting with paint.- 12.4. Use of dry-transfer materials.- 12.4.1. Lettering.- 12.4.2. Tones.- 12.4.3. Making corrections.- 12.5. Use of self-adhesive tones and colours.- 12.5.1. Methods of application.- 12.5.2. Trapped air bubbles.- 12.5.3. 'Windows'.- 12.6. Simple object drawing for line diagrams.- 12.6.1. General principles.- 12.6.2. Basic shapes.- 12.6.3. Lighting.- 12.6.4. Special effects.- 12.6.5. Making symmetrical shapes.- 12.6.6. Observation of objects.- 13. Working method.- 13.1. Planning the illustration.- 13.1.1. Choice of media.- 13.1.2. Summary of standards.- 13.2. Making the draft.- 13.2.1. Rough sketches.- 13.2.2. The use of graph paper for drafts.- 13.2.3. The use of typewriter grids.- 13.3. Using the draft.- 13.3.1. Fixing the draft to the artwork or drawing board.- 13.3.2. Transferring information from the draft to the final artwork.- 13.4. Making the final artwork.- 13.5. Making additions to the artwork.- Literature.
Responsibility: by Linda Reynolds and Doig Simmonds.

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