skip to content
The Press & the American Revolution Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The Press & the American Revolution

Author: Bernard Bailyn; John B Hench
Publisher: Worcester, [Mass.] : American Antiquarian Society, 1980.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
From the Foreword: This book of essays on the activities, place, and influence of American printers and journalists during the period of our Revolution is the American Antiquarian Society's primary scholarly contribution to the two hundredth anniversary of that pivotal process. Since its founding in 1812 by Isaiah Thomas, one of the leading journalists of the Revolutionary era, the American Antiquarian Society has  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Press & the American Revolution.
Worcester, [Mass.] : American Antiquarian Society, 1980
(OCoLC)567700865
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Bernard Bailyn; John B Hench
ISBN: 0912296186 9780912296180
OCLC Number: 6239628
Description: 383 p. ; 27 cm.
Contents: Printers and the American Revolution / by Stephen Botein --
Freedom of the press in revolutionary America: the evolution of libertarianism, 1760-1820 / by Richard Buel, Jr. --
The role of the newspaper press in the Southern colonies on the eve of the revolution: an interpretation / by Robert M. Weir --
The colonial German-language press and the American Revolution / by Willi Paul Adams --
The character and coherence of the Loyalist press / by Janice Potter and Robert M. Calhoon --
British correspondence in the colonial press, 1763-1775: a study in Anglo-American misunderstanding before the American Revolution / by Paul Langford --
Some statistics on American printing, 1764-1783 / by G. Thomas Tanselle --
Afterword: The legacy of the press in the America Revolution / by James Russell Wiggins.
Responsibility: edited by Bernard Bailyn and John B. Hench ; with a foreword by Marcus A. McCorison ; and an afterword by James Russell Wiggins.

Abstract:

From the Foreword: This book of essays on the activities, place, and influence of American printers and journalists during the period of our Revolution is the American Antiquarian Society's primary scholarly contribution to the two hundredth anniversary of that pivotal process. Since its founding in 1812 by Isaiah Thomas, one of the leading journalists of the Revolutionary era, the American Antiquarian Society has expended a very large portion of its energies upon the collection, recording, and dissemination of the fundamental printed records of the American Revolution-its precursing events and its aftermath. The Society has done so in the strong belief that the influence of those who controlled the printed word were the persons crucial to the formation of a revolution within the minds of Americans, as well as to the act of overt revolt. Thus, the history of the Society is inextricably linked with the American press and with the American Revolution and has resulted in our enduring interest in the history of printing and publishing of the country. Thomas, himself, established this focus his own lifetime, for his narrative of the contribution of American printers to the development of our cultural life during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries is, after 167 years, still informative, and it remains in print. Thomas also compiled the first list of American imprints of the colonial period, which was edited and published by the Society in 1874. Succeeding Society members and staff have followed our founder by actively enlarging knowledge of the American printed record and, through its interpretation, expanding our understanding of American history and culture. Thus, this book of essays falls squarely within the traditional concerns of the Society and we trust it serves to deepen our understanding of the role of the printers during the Revolution. Isaiah Thomas provides a link between the press, the Revolution, and this Society, a link that may serve to introduce this volume.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/6239628>
library:oclcnum"6239628"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/6239628>
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdfs:seeAlso
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Presse--États-Unis--Histoire--18e siècle."
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Imprimerie--États-Unis--Histoire--18e siècle."
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"American Revolution (1775-1783)"
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:datePublished"1980"
schema:description"From the Foreword: This book of essays on the activities, place, and influence of American printers and journalists during the period of our Revolution is the American Antiquarian Society's primary scholarly contribution to the two hundredth anniversary of that pivotal process. Since its founding in 1812 by Isaiah Thomas, one of the leading journalists of the Revolutionary era, the American Antiquarian Society has expended a very large portion of its energies upon the collection, recording, and dissemination of the fundamental printed records of the American Revolution-its precursing events and its aftermath. The Society has done so in the strong belief that the influence of those who controlled the printed word were the persons crucial to the formation of a revolution within the minds of Americans, as well as to the act of overt revolt. Thus, the history of the Society is inextricably linked with the American press and with the American Revolution and has resulted in our enduring interest in the history of printing and publishing of the country. Thomas, himself, established this focus his own lifetime, for his narrative of the contribution of American printers to the development of our cultural life during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries is, after 167 years, still informative, and it remains in print. Thomas also compiled the first list of American imprints of the colonial period, which was edited and published by the Society in 1874. Succeeding Society members and staff have followed our founder by actively enlarging knowledge of the American printed record and, through its interpretation, expanding our understanding of American history and culture. Thus, this book of essays falls squarely within the traditional concerns of the Society and we trust it serves to deepen our understanding of the role of the printers during the Revolution. Isaiah Thomas provides a link between the press, the Revolution, and this Society, a link that may serve to introduce this volume."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/351031770>
schema:genre"History."
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The Press & the American Revolution"
schema:numberOfPages"383"
schema:publisher
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"American Antiquarian Society"
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.