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The prince

Author: Niccolò Machiavelli; W K Marriott; Nelle Fuller; Thomas Hobbes
Publisher: Chicago : Encyclopædia Britannica, [1955, ©1952]
Series: Great books of the Western world, v. 23.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Genre/Form: Early works
Early works to 1800
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Machiavelli, Niccolò, 1469-1527.
Prince.
Chicago, Encyclopædia Britannica [1955, ©1952]
(OCoLC)756456402
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Niccolò Machiavelli; W K Marriott; Nelle Fuller; Thomas Hobbes
OCLC Number: 913617
Description: xi, 283 pages : diagram ; 25 cm.
Contents: Prince : How many kinds of principalities there are, and by what means they are acquired --
Concerning hereditary principalities --
Concerning mixed principalities --
Why the kingdom of Darius, conquered by Alexander, did not rebel against the successors of Alexander at his death --
Concerning the way to govern cities or principalities, which lived under their own laws before they were annexed --
Concerning principalities which are acquired by one's own arms and ability --
Concerning new principalities which are acquired either by the arms of others or by good fortune --
Concerning those who have obtained a principality by wickedness --
Concerning a civil principality --
Concerning the way in which the strength of all principalities ought to be measured --
Concerning ecclesiastical principalities --
How many kinds of soldiery there are and concerning mercenaries --
Concerning auxiliaries, mixed soldiery, and one's own --
That which concerns a prince on the subject of the art of war --
Concerning things for which men, and especially princes, are praised or blamed --
Concerning liberality and meanness --
Concerning cruelty and clemency, and whether it is better to be loved than feared --
Concerning the way in which princes should keep the faith --
That one should avoid being despised and hated --
Are fortresses, and many other things to which princes resort, advantageous or hurtful? --
How a prince should conduct himself so as to gain renown --
Concerning the secretaries of princes --
How flatterers should by avoided --
Why the princes of Italy have lost their states --
What fortune can effect in human affairs, and how to withstand her --
Exhortation to liberate Italy from the barbarians. Leviathan : pt. 1. Of man --
Of sense --
Of imagination --
Of the consequence or train of imaginations --
Of speech --
Of reason and science --
Of the interior beginnings of voluntary motions, commonly called the passions; and the speeches by which they are expressed --
Of the ends or resolutions of discourse --
Of the virtues, commonly called intellectual, and their contrary defects --
Of the several subjects of knowledge --
Of power, worth, dignity, honour, and worthiness --
Of the difference of manners --
Of religion --
Of the natural condition of mankind as concerning their felicity and misery --
Of the first and second natural laws, and of contracts --
Of other laws of nature --
Of persons, authors, and things personated --
pt. 2. Of commonwealth --
Of the causes, generation, and definition of a commonwealth --
Of the rights of sovereigns by institution --
Of the several kinds of commonwealth by institution, and of succession to the sovereign power --
Of dominion paternal and despotical --
Of the liberty of subjects --
Of systems subject, political, and private --
Of the public ministers of sovereign power --
Of the nutrition and procreation of a commonwealth --
Of counsel --
Of civil laws --
Of crime, excuses, and extenuations --
Of punishments and rewards --
Of those things that weaken or tend to the dissolution of a commonwealth --
Of the office of the sovereign representative --
Of the kingdom of god by nature --
pt. 3. Of a Christian commonwealth --
Of the principles of Christian politics --
Of the number, antiquity, scope, authority, and interpreters of the books of Holy Scripture --
Of the signification of spirit, angel, and inspiration in the books of Holy Scripture --
Of the signification in scripture of kingdom of God, of holy, sacred, and sacrament --
Of the word of God and of prophets --
Of miracles and their use --
Of the signification in scripture of eternal life, Hell, salvation, the world to come, and redemption --
Of the signification in scripture of the word Church --
Of the rights of the kingdom of God, in Abraham, Moses, the high priests, and the Kings of Judah --
Of the office of our blessed saviour --
Of power ecclesiastical --
Of what is necessary for a man's reception into the kingdom of Heaven --
pt. 4. Of the kingdom of darkness --
Of spiritual darkness from misinterpretation of scripture --
Of demonology and other relics of the religion of the Gentiles --
Of darkness from vain philosophy and fabulous traditions --
Of the benefit that proceedeth from such darkness, and to whom it accrueth --
A review and conclusion.
Series Title: Great books of the Western world, v. 23.
Other Titles: Principe.
Leviathan
Responsibility: by Nicolò Machiavelli, translated by W.K. Marriott. Leviathan ; or, Matter, form, and power of a commonwealth, ecclesiastical and civil / by Thomas Hobbes, edited by Nelle Fuller.

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