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The prince

Author: Niccolò Machiavelli; George Bull
Publisher: London ; New York : Penguin Books, 2003.
Series: Penguin classics.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : Reissued with revisionsView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The classic handbook of statecraft written by an Italian nobleman recommends guile and craftiness to attain and maintain political power.
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Genre/Form: Early works
Early works to 1800
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Niccolò Machiavelli; George Bull
ISBN: 0140449159 9780140449150 0140447520 9780140447521
OCLC Number: 50937553
Language Note: Translated from the Italian.
Description: xxxiv, 106 p. : map ; 20 cm.
Contents: Chronology --
Map --
Introduction / Anthony Grafton --
Further reading --
Translator's note --
The prince --
Letter to the magnificent Lorenzo dé Medici --
I. How many kinds of principality there are and the ways in which they are acquired --
II. Hereditary principalities --
III. Composite principalities --
IV. Why the kingdom of Darius conquered by Alexander did not rebel against his successors after his death --
V. How cities or principalities which lived under their own laws should be administered after being conquered --
VI. New principalities acquired by one's own arms and prowess --
VII. New principalities acquired with the help of fortune and foreign arms --
VIII. Those who come to power by crime --
IX. The constitutional principality --
X. How the strength of every principality should me measured --
XI. Ecclesiastical principalities --
XII. Military organization and mercenary troops --
XIII. Auxiliary, composite, and native troops --
XIV. How a prince should organize his militia --
XV. The things for which men, and especially princes, are praised or blamed --
XVI. Generosity and parsimony --
XVII. Cruelty and compassions ; and whether it is better to be loved than feared, or the reverse --
XVIII. How princes should honour their word --
XIX. The need to avoid contempt and hatred --
XX. Whether fortresses and many of the other present-day expedients to which princes have recourse are useful or not --
XXI. How a prince must act to win honour --
XXII. A prince's personal staff --
XXIII. How flatterers must be shunned --
XXIV. Why the Italian princes have lost their states --
XXV. How far human affairs are governed by fortune, an dhow fortune can be opposed --
XXVI. Exhortation to liberate Italy from the barbarians --
Glossary of proper names.
Series Title: Penguin classics.
Other Titles: Principe.
Responsibility: Niccolò Machiavelli ; translated with notes by George Bull ; introduction by Anthony Grafton.
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Abstract:

Machiavelli's treatise on statecraft, first published in 1517. Using as his model Cesare Borgia, a Florentine prince who stopped at nothing to achieve political position, Machiavelli describes, even  Read more...

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