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Principles of Geodynamics

Author: Adrian E Scheidegger
Publisher: Berlin, Heidelberg : Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 1958.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Geodynamics is an old science. Most of the basic theories have been conceived in principle during the 19th century and not many fundamen­ tal ideas have been added since. Some progress has been made in the following-up of these concepts and, in some instances, in the deter­ mination of some important facts about the Earth. Nevertheless, geo­ dynamics has been a highly speculative subject for about a hundred years  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Adrian E Scheidegger
ISBN: 9783662015322 3662015323
OCLC Number: 851381918
Language Note: English.
Description: 1 online resource (xi, 280 pages)
Contents: I. Physiographic and Geological Data Regarding the Earth --
1.1. Introduction --
1.2. Geological Evolution --
1.3. Geography of Continents and Oceans --
1.4. Physiography of Orogenetic Systems --
1.5. Physiography of Faults and Folds --
1.6. Physiography of Other Features --
II. Geophysical Data Regarding the Earth --
2.1. Gravity Data --
2.2. Seismological Data --
2.3. The Layering of the Earth --
2.4. Data from Age Determinations --
2.5. Thermal Data --
2.6. Data from Magnetization of Rocks --
2.7. Geochemical Data --
III. The Mechanics of Deformation --
3.1. Finite Strain in Rheological Bodies --
3.2. Elasticity and Plasticity --
3.3. Hydrodynamics of Viscous Fluids --
3.4. Other Types of Rheological Behavior --
3.5. Discontinuous Displacements --
3.6. Rheology of the Earth: The Basic Problem of Geodynamics --
IV. Effects of the Rotation of the Earth --
4.1. The Figure of the Earth --
4.2. The Polfluchtkraft --
4.3. The Question of Stability of the Earth's Axis of Rotation --
4.4. Other Effects of the Earth's Rotation --
V. Continents and Oceans --
5.1. Primeval History of the Earth --
5.2. Evolution and Growth of Primeval Continents --
5.3. Primeval Convection --
5.4. Tetrahedral Shrinkage --
5.5. Formation of Continents by Expansion --
5.6. Evaluation of Theories of Continents and Oceans --
VI. Orogenesis --
6.1. Fundamentals --
6.2. The Contraction Hypothesis --
6.3. Continental Drift Theory --
6.4. Convection Current Hypothesis of Orogenesis --
6.5. The Hypothesis of Zonal Rotation --
6.6. Undation Theory --
6.7. Expansion Hypothesis of Orogenesis --
6.8. Orogenesis and the Rotation of the Earth --
6.9. Evaluation of Theories of Orogenesis --
VII. Dynamics of Faulting and Folding --
7.1. Dynamics of Faulting --
7.2. Theory of Earthquakes --
7.3. Analytical Theories of Folding --
7.4. Model Experiments of Faults and Folds --
7.5. Theory of Systems of Faults and Folds --
7.6. Evaluation of Theories of Faults and Folds --
VIII. Dynamics of Other Features --
8.1. Meteor Craters --
8.2. Boudinage --
8.3. Domes --
8.4. Volcanism --
8.5. Postglacial Uplift --
8.6. Conclusion --
Author Index.
Responsibility: by Adrian E. Scheidegger.

Abstract:

Geodynamics is an old science. Most of the basic theories have been conceived in principle during the 19th century and not many fundamen­ tal ideas have been added since. Some progress has been made in the following-up of these concepts and, in some instances, in the deter­ mination of some important facts about the Earth. Nevertheless, geo­ dynamics has been a highly speculative subject for about a hundred years and it is not likely that this situation will change during the next hundred. It is also unlikely that many basic new ideas will be added in that time interval. The reason for this lies in the extreme difficulty of obtaining really relevant data about the mechanics of the Earth, partly due to the impossibility of probing into the depths of the Earth by direct means to any considerable extent and partly due to the fact that the time intervals in which . . something happens" are of the order of millions of years, which is much too long for any human being to wait and ex­ periment with. The situation in geodynamics is, therefore much akin to that which existed when the ancient Greek philosophers were speculating about the possibly atomic structure of matter: there was, at that time, absolutely no hope to either confirm or to reject the hypothesis.

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