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The principles of moral and political philosophy

Author: William Paley
Publisher: Indianapolis, Ind. : Liberty Fund, ©2002.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This classic work by William Paley was one of the most popular books in England and America in the early nineteenth century. Its significance lies in the fact that it marks an important point at which eighteenth century "whiggism" began to be transformed into nineteenth century "liberalism." First published in 1785, Paley's Principles of Moral and Political Philosophy was originally based on his Cambridge lectures  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: William Paley
ISBN: 0865973806 9780865973800 0865973814 9780865973817
OCLC Number: 50285276
Description: xliv, 481 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Foreword / D. L. Le Mahieu --
Letter to the Bishop of Carlisle / William Paley --
Bk. I. Preliminary Considerations --
1. Definition and Use of the Science --
2. The Law of Honour --
3. The Law of the Land --
4. The Scriptures --
5. The Moral Sense --
6. Human Happiness --
7. Virtue --
Bk. II. Moral Obligation --
1. The Question, Why Am I Obliged to Keep My Word? Considered --
2. What We Mean, When We Say a Man Is Obliged to Do a Thing --
3. The Question, Why Am I Obliged to Keep My Word? Resumed --
4. The Will of God --
5. The Divine Benevolence --
6. Utility --
7. The Necessity of General Rules --
8. The Consideration of General Consequences Pursued --
9. Of Right --
10. The Division of Rights --
11. The General Rights of Mankind --
Bk. III. Relative Duties --
Pt. I. Of Relative Duties Which Are Determinate --
1. Of Property --
2. The Use of the Institution of Property --
3. The History of Property --
4. In What the Right of Property Is Founded --
5. Promises --
6. Contracts --
7. Contracts of Sale --
8. Contracts of Hazard --
9. Contracts of Lending of Inconsumable Property --
10. Contracts Concerning the Lending of Money --
11. Contracts of Labour - Service --
12. Contracts of Labour - Commissions --
13. Contracts of Labour - Partnership --
14. Contracts of Labour - Offices --
15. Lies --
16. Oaths --
17. Oath in Evidence --
18. Oath of Allegiance --
19. Oaths Against Bribery in the Election of Members of Parliament --
20. Oath Against Simony --
21. Oaths to Observe Local Statutes --
22. Subscription to Articles of Religion --
23. Wills --
Pt. II. Of Relative Duties Which Are Indeterminate, and of the Crimes Opposite to These --
1. Charity --
2. Charity - The Treatment of Our Domestics and Dependants --
3. Slavery --
4. Charity - Professional Assistance --
5. Charity - Pecuniary Bounty --
6. Resentment --
7. Anger --
8. Revenge --
9. Duelling --
10. Litigation --
11. Gratitude --
12. Slander Pt. III. Of Relative Duties Which Result from the Constitution of the Sexes, and of the Crimes Opposed to These --
1. Of the Public Use of Marriage Institutions --
2. Fornication --
3. Seduction --
4. Adultery --
5. Incest --
6. Polygamy --
7. Divorce --
8. Marriage --
9. Of the Duty of Parents --
10. The Rights of Parents --
11. The Duty of Children --
Bk. IV. Duties to Ourselves --
1. The Rights of Self-Defence --
2. Drunkenness --
3. Suicide --
Bk. V. Duties Towards God --
1. Division of These Duties --
2. Of the Duty and of the Efficacy of Prayer, so far as the Same Appear from the Light of Nature --
3. Of the Duty and Efficacy of Prayer, as Represented in Scripture --
4. Of Private Prayer, Family Prayer, and Public Worship --
5. Of Forms of Prayer in Public Worship --
6. Of the Use of Sabbatical Institutions --
7. Of the Scripture Account of Sabbatical Institutions --
8. By What Acts and Omissions the Duty of the Christian Sabbath Is Violated --
9. Of Reverencing the Deity --
Bk. VI. Elements of Political Knowledge --
1. Of the Origin of Civil Government --
2. How Subjection to Civil Government Is Maintained --
3. The Duty of Submission to Civil Government Explained --
4. Of the Duty of Civil Obedience, as Stated in the Christian Scriptures --
5. Of Civil Liberty --
6. Of Different Forms of Government --
7. Of the British Constitution --
8. Of the Administration of Justice --
9. Of Crimes and Punishments --
10. Of Religious Establishments and of Toleration --
11. Of Population and Provision; and of Agriculture and Commerce, as Subservient Thereto --
12. Of War and Military Establishments.
Other Titles: Moral and political philosophy
Responsibility: William Paley ; foreword by D.L. Le Mahieu.

Abstract:

This classic work by William Paley was one of the most popular books in England and America in the early nineteenth century. Its significance lies in the fact that it marks an important point at which eighteenth century "whiggism" began to be transformed into nineteenth century "liberalism." First published in 1785, Paley's Principles of Moral and Political Philosophy was originally based on his Cambridge lectures of 1766-1776. It was designed for instructional purposes and was almost immediately adopted as a required text for all undergraduates at Cambridge. The great popularity of Paley's Principles is perhaps due in part to the author's remarkable gift for clear exposition. Even today, this work is very readable and easily comprehended. But the popularity of the book also reflected the fact that Paley expressed some of the leading scientific, theological, and ethical ideas of his time and place. In this respect, Paley's great classic provides valuable insight into the Anglo-American mind of the early nineteenth century and helps us better understand the thinking processes and evolving concepts of liberty and virtue that were displacing the old "whiggism" of the preceding century. - Publisher.

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