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Print, manuscript, and the search for order, 1450-1830

Author: David McKitterick
Publisher: Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2003.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"This book re-examines fundamental aspects of what has been widely termed the printing revolution of the early modern period. David McKitterick argues that many of the changes associated with printing were only gradually absorbed over almost 400 years, a much longer period than usually suggested. From the 1450s onwards, the printed word and image became familiar in most of Europe. For authors, makers of books, and  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Bibliography
History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: David McKitterick
ISBN: 052182690X 9780521826907 0521618525 9780521618526
OCLC Number: 51020274
Description: xv, 311 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: The printed word and the modern bibliographer --
Dependent skills --
Pictures in motley --
A house of errors --
Perfect and imperfect --
The art of printing --
Re-evaluation: towards the modern book --
Machinery and manugacture --
Instabilities: the inherent and the deliberate.
Responsibility: David McKitterick.
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Abstract:

This magisterial study re-examines the relationship between manuscript and print in the early modern period.  Read more...

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'The general reader will find David McKitterick's Print, Manuscript and the Search for Order richly rewarding, full of unexpected insights into the making and reading of books over almost 400 years. Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""This book re-examines fundamental aspects of what has been widely termed the printing revolution of the early modern period. David McKitterick argues that many of the changes associated with printing were only gradually absorbed over almost 400 years, a much longer period than usually suggested. From the 1450s onwards, the printed word and image became familiar in most of Europe. For authors, makers of books, and readers, manuscript and print were henceforth to be understood as complements to each other, rather than alternatives. But while printing seems to offer more textual and pictorial consistency than manuscripts, this was not always the case. McKitterick argues that book historians and bibliographers alike have been dominated by notions of the uses of the early printed book that did not come into existence until the late nineteenth century, and he invites his readers to work forward from the past, rather than backwards into it."--Jacket."
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