passa ai contenuti
The private life of Chairman Mao : the memoirs of Mao's personal physician Anteprima di questo documento
ChiudiAnteprima di questo documento
Stiamo controllando…

The private life of Chairman Mao : the memoirs of Mao's personal physician

Autore: Zhisui Li; Anne F Thurston
Editore: New York : Random House, ©1994.
Edizione/Formato:   Libro : Biography : English : 1st edVedi tutte le edizioni e i formati
Banca dati:WorldCat
Sommario:
"From 1954 until Mao Zedong's death twenty-two years later, Dr. Li Zhisui was the Chinese ruler's personal physician, which put him in almost daily - and increasingly intimate - contact with Mao and his inner circle. For most of these years, Mao's health was excellent; thus he and the doctor had time to discuss political and personal matters. Dr. Li recorded many of these conversations in his diaries as well as in  Per saperne di più…
Voto:

(non ancora votato) 0 con commenti - Diventa il primo.

Soggetti
Altri come questo

 

Trova una copia in biblioteca

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Stiamo ricercando le biblioteche che possiedono questo documento…

Dettagli

Genere/forma: Biography
Informazioni aggiuntive sul formato: Online version:
Li, Zhisui, 1919-
Private life of Chairman Mao.
New York : Random House, ©1994
(OCoLC)621485680
Persona incaricata: Zedong Mao; Zedong Mao
Tipo materiale: Biography
Tipo documento: Book
Tutti gli autori / Collaboratori: Zhisui Li; Anne F Thurston
ISBN: 0679400354 9780679400356 0679764437 9780679764434
Numero OCLC: 30893068
Descrizione: xxii, 682 pages, [16] pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
Responsabilità: Dr. Li Zhisui ; translated by Professor Tai Hung-chao ; with the editorial assistance of Anne F. Thurston ; foreword by Andrew J. Nathan.
Maggiori informazioni:

Abstract:

"From 1954 until Mao Zedong's death twenty-two years later, Dr. Li Zhisui was the Chinese ruler's personal physician, which put him in almost daily - and increasingly intimate - contact with Mao and his inner circle. For most of these years, Mao's health was excellent; thus he and the doctor had time to discuss political and personal matters. Dr. Li recorded many of these conversations in his diaries as well as in his memory. In The Private Life of Chairman Mao he vividly reconstructs his extraordinary experience. The result is a book that will profoundly alter our view of Chairman Mao and of China under his rule." "Dr. Li clarifies numerous long-standing puzzles, such as the true nature of Mao's feelings toward the United States and the Soviet Union. He describes Mao's deliberate rudeness toward Khrushchev when the Soviet leader paid his secret visit to Beijing in 1958, and we learn here, for the first time, how Mao came to invite the American table tennis team to China, a decision that led to Nixon's historic visit a few months later. We also learn why Mao took the disastrous Great Leap Forward, which resulted in the worst famine in recorded history, and his equally strange reason for risking war with the United States by shelling the Taiwanese islands of Quemoy and Matsu." "Dr. Li supplies surprising portraits of Zhou Enlai and many other top leaders. He describes Mao's perverse relationship with his wife, and gives us insight into the sexual politics of Mao's court. We witness Mao's bizarre death and the even stranger events that followed it. Dr. Li tells of Mao's remarkable gift for intimacy, as well as of his indifference to the suffering and deaths of millions of his fellow Chinese, including old comrades. Readers will find here a full and accurate account of Mao's sex life, and of such personal details as his peculiar sleeping arrangements and his dependency on barbiturates."--Jacket.

Commenti

Commenti degli utenti
Recuperando commenti GoodReads…
Stiamo recuperando commenti DOGObooks

Etichette

Le etichette di tutti gli utenti (3)

Vedi le etichette più popolari come: lista di etichette | nuvola di etichette

Documenti simili

Soggetti correlati:(6)

Liste di utenti con questo documento (3)

Conferma questa richiesta

Potresti aver già richiesto questo documento. Seleziona OK se si vuole procedere comunque con questa richiesta.

Dati collegati


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/30893068>
bgn:translationOfWork
library:oclcnum"30893068"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"1st ed."
schema:contributor
schema:copyrightYear"1994"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1994"
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/18005680>
schema:genre"Biography"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The private life of Chairman Mao : the memoirs of Mao's personal physician"@en
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:reviews
rdf:typeschema:Review
schema:itemReviewed<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/30893068>
schema:reviewBody""From 1954 until Mao Zedong's death twenty-two years later, Dr. Li Zhisui was the Chinese ruler's personal physician, which put him in almost daily - and increasingly intimate - contact with Mao and his inner circle. For most of these years, Mao's health was excellent; thus he and the doctor had time to discuss political and personal matters. Dr. Li recorded many of these conversations in his diaries as well as in his memory. In The Private Life of Chairman Mao he vividly reconstructs his extraordinary experience. The result is a book that will profoundly alter our view of Chairman Mao and of China under his rule." "Dr. Li clarifies numerous long-standing puzzles, such as the true nature of Mao's feelings toward the United States and the Soviet Union. He describes Mao's deliberate rudeness toward Khrushchev when the Soviet leader paid his secret visit to Beijing in 1958, and we learn here, for the first time, how Mao came to invite the American table tennis team to China, a decision that led to Nixon's historic visit a few months later. We also learn why Mao took the disastrous Great Leap Forward, which resulted in the worst famine in recorded history, and his equally strange reason for risking war with the United States by shelling the Taiwanese islands of Quemoy and Matsu." "Dr. Li supplies surprising portraits of Zhou Enlai and many other top leaders. He describes Mao's perverse relationship with his wife, and gives us insight into the sexual politics of Mao's court. We witness Mao's bizarre death and the even stranger events that followed it. Dr. Li tells of Mao's remarkable gift for intimacy, as well as of his indifference to the suffering and deaths of millions of his fellow Chinese, including old comrades. Readers will find here a full and accurate account of Mao's sex life, and of such personal details as his peculiar sleeping arrangements and his dependency on barbiturates."--Jacket."
schema:workExample
schema:workExample
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Chiudi finestra

Per favore entra in WorldCat 

Non hai un account? Puoi facilmente crearne uno gratuito.