skip to content
Property and justice Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Property and justice

Author: J W Harris
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Clarendon Press, 1996.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
When philosophers put forward claims for or against 'property', it is often unclear whether they are talking about the same thing that lawyers mean by 'property'. Likewise, when lawyers appeal to 'justice' in interpreting or criticizing legal rules, we do not know whether they have in mind something that philosophers would recognize as 'justice'.
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: J W Harris
ISBN: 0198259573 9780198259572
OCLC Number: 34691283
Description: xxvi, 387 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Pt. I. What is Property? 1. Introduction. 2. Imaginary Societies. 3. Minimal Structure. 4. Building upon the Minimal Structure. 5. Ownership as an Organizing Idea. 6. Ownership as a Principle. 7. Private and Non-private Property. 8. Person-Thing and Person-Person Relations. 9. What Property is --
Pt. II. Is Property Just? 10. The Agenda. 11. Natural Property Rights and Labour. 12. Natural Property Rights and the Assault Analogy. 13. Property and Freedom. 14. Against Property Freedoms. 15. The Instrumental Values of Property. 16. Alleged Dominating Principles. 17. The Limits of Property. 18. Property is Just, to a Degree, Sometimes.
Responsibility: J.W. Harris.
More information:

Abstract:

When philosophers put forward claims for or against 'property', it is often unclear whether they are talking about the same thing that lawyers mean by 'property'. Likewise, when lawyers appeal to 'justice' in interpreting or criticizing legal rules, we do not know whether they have in mind something that philosophers would recognize as 'justice'.

Bridging the gulf between juristic writing on property and speculations about it appearing in the tradition of western political philosophy, Professor Harris has built from entirely new foundations an analytical framework for understanding the nature of property and its connection with justice. Property and Justice ranges over natural property rights; property as a prerequisite of freedom; incentives and markets; demands for equality of resources; property as domination; property and basic needs; and the question of whether property should be extended to information and to human bodily parts. It maintains that property institutions deal both with the use of things and the allocation of wealth, and that everyone has a 'right' that society should provide such an institution.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(8)

User lists with this item (1)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/34691283>
library:oclcnum"34691283"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/34691283>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1996"
schema:description"When philosophers put forward claims for or against 'property', it is often unclear whether they are talking about the same thing that lawyers mean by 'property'. Likewise, when lawyers appeal to 'justice' in interpreting or criticizing legal rules, we do not know whether they have in mind something that philosophers would recognize as 'justice'."@en
schema:description"Pt. I. What is Property? 1. Introduction. 2. Imaginary Societies. 3. Minimal Structure. 4. Building upon the Minimal Structure. 5. Ownership as an Organizing Idea. 6. Ownership as a Principle. 7. Private and Non-private Property. 8. Person-Thing and Person-Person Relations. 9. What Property is -- Pt. II. Is Property Just? 10. The Agenda. 11. Natural Property Rights and Labour. 12. Natural Property Rights and the Assault Analogy. 13. Property and Freedom. 14. Against Property Freedoms. 15. The Instrumental Values of Property. 16. Alleged Dominating Principles. 17. The Limits of Property. 18. Property is Just, to a Degree, Sometimes."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/10285054>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Property and justice"@en
schema:numberOfPages"387"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.