skip to content
Psychological and psychosocial consequences of combat and deployment : with special emphasis on the Gulf War Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Psychological and psychosocial consequences of combat and deployment : with special emphasis on the Gulf War

Author: David H Marlowe
Publisher: Santa Monica, CA : RAND, 2001.
Series: Gulf War illnesses series.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Research in the neurosciences has demonstrated that the boundary between the external world (its events, pressures, concerns and stress) and the brain and body has been broken. The concept of anything being all in the mind is scientifically and intellectually dead. While some data remain ambiguous and direct causal effect cannot be given to stress per se, the overall patterns of research findings demonstrate that  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Marlowe, David H.
Psychological and psychosocial consequences of combat and deployment.
Santa Monica, CA : RAND, 2001
(OCoLC)606514155
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: David H Marlowe
ISBN: 0833026852 9780833026859
OCLC Number: 45799380
Description: xxxi, 181 p. ; 26 cm.
Contents: Historical overview: psychological consequences of battle stress --
Modern war: the American Civil War --
Conceptual and theoretical medical developments in the 19th and early 20th centures --
World War I --
1919-1941: the interwar years --
World War II --
Post-World War II conceptual developments --
Vetnam --
The Gulf War: operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm --
Return from the Persian Gulf and its consequences.
Series Title: Gulf War illnesses series.
Responsibility: David H. Marlowe.

Abstract:

Argues that, to be helpful to veterans, we must deal with this issue of complexity and not simply focus on a hypothecated or hoped for singular cause of Gulf War illness.  Read more...

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/45799380>
library:oclcnum"45799380"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/45799380>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1170363>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"War--Psychological aspects"@en
schema:name"War--Psychological aspects."@en
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1165789>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Veterans--Psychological aspects"@en
schema:name"Veterans--Psychological aspects."@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1072762>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Post-traumatic stress disorder"@en
schema:name"Post-traumatic stress disorder."@en
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/868934>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Combat--Psychological aspects"@en
schema:name"Combat--Psychological aspects."@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh91001459>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Persian Gulf War, 1991--Veterans--Psychological aspects."@en
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2001"
schema:description"Research in the neurosciences has demonstrated that the boundary between the external world (its events, pressures, concerns and stress) and the brain and body has been broken. The concept of anything being all in the mind is scientifically and intellectually dead. While some data remain ambiguous and direct causal effect cannot be given to stress per se, the overall patterns of research findings demonstrate that stress is a contributing factor to many illnesses, including somatic and psychological symptoms. Therefore, very real consequences attend those who experience prolonged subacute chronic stress, which characterized in the Gulf deployment, combat, and return home. It is feasible that the effects of these stresses made some soldiers more vulnerable to environmental pathogens, both in the theater and at home, than they would otherwise have been. The symptoms of such insults, nested in sociocultural beliefs about illness and the Gulf, might well have amplified deleterious somatic consequences. Like many illnesses, those pertaining to service in the Gulf have been culturally shaped. An illness narrative describes the causes of the illness as perceived by the patient and is most often constructed out of the assertions, metaphors, folklore, causal attributions, and adduced causes common in the patient's culture. Other agents of a presumed authorities, the Internet, and support and self-help groups. Such illness narratives can become an important factor in shaping both the nature and interpretation of symptoms by the patient. A cogent, widespread, and widely shared illness narrative is certainly a characteristic development of Gulf War illness. The threads of combat and deployment stress and the side spectrum of possible responses, as demonstrated throughout history, weaves into the matrix of possible illness causation. It is also possible that a subset of the population is (in some ways, not yet understood) vulnerable and predisposed to injurious responses to the multiple stressors experienced in deployment and combat. This book argues that, to be most helpful to veterans, we must deal with this issue of complexity and not simply focus on a hypothecated or hoped for singular cause of Gulf War illness."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/16876613>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Psychological and psychosocial consequences of combat and deployment : with special emphasis on the Gulf War"@en
schema:numberOfPages"181"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.