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Psychological inquiries : the second part : being a series of essays intended to illustrate some points in the physical and moral history of man.

Auteur : Benjamin Brodie, Sir
Éditeur : London : Longman, Green, Longman, & Roberts, 1862.
Édition/format :   Livre électronique : Document : AnglaisVoir toutes les éditions et tous les formats
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
"In offering a Second Part of "Psychological Inquiries" to the notice of the public, I have no expectation that it will be found to include any record of facts which were not already known to many of my readers; nor do I doubt that those who have been in the habit of reflecting on these subjects have arrived at conclusions very similar to those at which I have arrived myself. I have on the present occasion, as I had  Lire la suite...
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Détails

Genre/forme : Electronic books
Type d’ouvrage : Document, Ressource Internet
Format : Ressource Internet, Fichier informatique
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : Benjamin Brodie, Sir
Numéro OCLC : 639167638
Notes de reproduction : Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2010. Available via World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement.
Description : xi, 247 p.
Autres titres : PsycBooks.

Résumé :

"In offering a Second Part of "Psychological Inquiries" to the notice of the public, I have no expectation that it will be found to include any record of facts which were not already known to many of my readers; nor do I doubt that those who have been in the habit of reflecting on these subjects have arrived at conclusions very similar to those at which I have arrived myself. I have on the present occasion, as I had formerly, two objects especially in view, one of these being to show that the solution of the complicated problem relating to the condition, character, and capabilities of man is not to be attained by a reference to only one department of knowledge; that for this purpose the observations of the physiologist must be combined with those of the moral philosopher, mutually helping and correcting each other, and that either of these alone would be insufficient. The other object to which I have alluded is, that I would claim for researches of this kind that they should be regarded not as merely curious speculations, but as being more or less of practical importance to every individual among us, enabling us to understand to how great an extent we may contribute to the improvement of the faculties with which we are endowed, and to our own well-being in life"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved).

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Données liées


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