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Psychology of the normal and subnormal.

Author: Henry Herbert Goddard
Publisher: New York, Dodd, Mead, 1919.
Series: Home economics archive--research, tradition and history.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"There are many different connotations (and misunderstandings) of the term "psychology" as used in the popular mind. It is unfortunate that a science of such fundamental importance for human welfare should be so little understood. Psychology should enable us to understand the nature of mental processes and to use that knowledge to improve our behaviour and to increase our efficiency. Psychology should enable us to  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Goddard, Henry Herbert, 1866-1957.
Psychology of the normal and subnormal.
New York, Dodd, Mead, 1919
(DLC) 19011177
(OCoLC)1090800
Named Person: His Royal Highness Prince Mahidol of Songkla
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Henry Herbert Goddard
OCLC Number: 652404431
Reproduction Notes: Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL
Description: 1 online resource (xxiv, 349 pages) illustrations.
Details: Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.
Series Title: Home economics archive--research, tradition and history.

Abstract:

"There are many different connotations (and misunderstandings) of the term "psychology" as used in the popular mind. It is unfortunate that a science of such fundamental importance for human welfare should be so little understood. Psychology should enable us to understand the nature of mental processes and to use that knowledge to improve our behaviour and to increase our efficiency. Psychology should enable us to control our conduct both through our understanding of ourselves and through an understanding of the motives and actions of others. Psychology is the science of mind; and mind determines human conduct. It would seem therefore highly desirable that the science of mind should be so formulated as to contribute to useful behaviour. When one asks the reason for this failure of psychology to have practical value one is apt to get the answer that psychology is a young science. But psychology is as old as Aristotle and Plato. There seem to be two types of human beings; those who deal mainly with concrete experiences and those who chiefly use symbols. Undoubtedly human development has progressed by the increased use of symbols. Symbols are time savers and energy conservers. Nevertheless symbols have their dangers. One may become so enamoured of the symbols that he forgets what they symbolize--he even gets to the point where he cares nothing for the thing symbolized. He is quite content with a clear and logical array of symbols. Now this may be very good for those who understand the symbols and enjoy their manipulation. We do not even deny that it is useful to pure science--provided it does not become a mere juggling of symbols; and, we think we should add, provided the handler of the symbols occasionally comes back to earth to see what his new symbols stand for. But all this symbolizing takes the subject out of reach of that much larger group who must have the matter in concrete form. Unfortunately for the practical use of psychology, our text books have generally been written by those who are capable of handling the symbols--with, we suspect, an occasional one written by a mere juggler with words. If our explanation is correct, it follows that psychology must eventually be written from the practical standpoint, in terms that can be appreciated by those who belong to the second type--those who do not enjoy symbols to the extent now used in psychological works. If the present book in any degree paves the way for this, it will serve its purpose. If this book has any distinguishing characteristics we believe they are mainly two: first, the recognition of the unity of mind which we have tried to picture more consistently than is usually done; and second, in the view of the emotions which so far as we know has never been presented in a text on psychology. It is hoped that this book will prove useful not only to those beginning the study of psychology in Normal Schools and Colleges but also to teachers who read for themselves, to parents who desire to understand their children, to the general reader who finds he needs to understand something of psychology in order to follow current discussions in pedagogy, sociology, feeble-mindedness, vocational guidance and allied subjects, and finally to all who wish to increase their own efficiency by understanding something of the workings of their own minds as well as the minds of their associates." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

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