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Public Diplomacy

Author: Michele T Bond; NATIONAL WAR COLL WASHINGTON DC.
Publisher: Ft. Belvoir Defense Technical Information Center 14 SEP 1998.
Edition/Format:   eBook : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Ambrose Bierce's well-known definition of a diplomat as a man "sent to lie abroad for his country" illustrates the widely-accepted perception of diplomats as secretive, deceptive manipulators who operate exclusively behind the scenes. In fact, most diplomatic work involves matters which are neither classified nor sensitive. Trade promotion, interventions on behalf of American businesses operating abroad,  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Michele T Bond; NATIONAL WAR COLL WASHINGTON DC.
OCLC Number: 74286592
Description: 10 p.

Abstract:

Ambrose Bierce's well-known definition of a diplomat as a man "sent to lie abroad for his country" illustrates the widely-accepted perception of diplomats as secretive, deceptive manipulators who operate exclusively behind the scenes. In fact, most diplomatic work involves matters which are neither classified nor sensitive. Trade promotion, interventions on behalf of American businesses operating abroad, adjudicating visas, writing position papers and talking points, and organizing the schedule of a visiting delegation of Members of Congress are examples of non-classified work which is carried out at virtually every diplomatic post. "Public diplomacy" is the term used to describe a government's conscious efforts to promote understanding of its own culture and interests among foreign publics, and to solicit their support for a policy objective. Routine diplomatic tasks such as those mentioned above significantly shape America's image in each country and in that respect are an important element of our public diplomacy. Like so many other aspects of our national governance, public diplomacy has been affected by globalization. There is now a diverse collection of actors engaging in activities which used to be the unique preserve of the government, and through which we could frame and focus public diplomacy in support of broad policy objectives. Private and professional organizations, nongovernmental organizations, sister city programs, humanitarian relief projects, and private business initiatives are examples of new players who compete with the U.S. Government for the attention and participation of foreign elites in their programs. Successful public diplomacy in a "globalized" world requires the ability to coordinate initiatives that the government does not directly control. The author relates how the end of the Cold War has changed the way in which public diplomacy is conducted with Russia and other members of the former Soviet bloc.

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