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Pulitzer

Author: W A Swanberg
Publisher: New York : Scribner, 1967.
Edition/Format:   Print book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
From the Blurb: This is the life-size portrait of a man of genius and an eccentric of unique proportions. Joseph Pulitzer revolutionized American journalism and exerted a powerful, progressive effect on American life. He did this by the force of a personality that was as admirable as it was outrageous. A Hungarian by birth, Joseph Pulitzer served briefly in the Civil War and then began his newspaper career in St.  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Swanberg, W.A., 1907-
Pulitzer.
New York, Scribner [1967]
(OCoLC)575105532
Named Person: Joseph Pulitzer; Joseph Pulitzer; Joseph Pulitzer
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: W A Swanberg
ISBN: 068410587X 9780684105871
OCLC Number: 1083334
Description: xiv, 462 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: List of illustrations --
Part 1: Angry Young Man: --
Chapter 1: Westward ho!: --
Goat of Company L --
Unburied corpses --
Search for independence --
Chapter 2: Bitten by politics: --
Murderous intent --
Breaking with Grant --
Chapter 3: Right hand of Schurz: --
Dream of reform --
Cincinnati fiasco --
Stumping for Greeley --
Republican turns democrat --
Chapter 4: Love on the run: --
Resolute Pulitzer, irresolute Tilden --
Not worthy of such love --
Uncertain and inconstant --
Politician's honeymoon --
Part 2: Sensationalist: --
Chapter 1: How to win circulation: --
Colossal nerve --
Pistol-packing editor --
Chapter 2: Road to power: --
Electionitis --
Beaten by the bourbons --
Loudest voice on the Mississippi --
Chapter 3: Unwelcome in St Louis: --
Killing at the post-dispatch --
Gentlemen, a change has taken place --
Part 3: Triumph: --
Chapter 1: Reformer and salesman: --
New social conscience --
Democrats, unite! --
Bucking the establishment --
Chapter 2: Electing a president: --
Defection of Dana --
Ma! Ma! Where's my pa? --
Burn this letter! --
Chapter 3: Disenchantment: --
Walking the bowery --
Office seekers --
Rescuing the goddess --
Creative mental power --
Looking for suggestive men --
Chapter 4: Nerves on edge: --
Profane philanthropist --
Four-month congressman --
Boodling Aldermen --
Electing a mayor --
Chapter 5: Spinning like a top: --
Democrat in Babylon --
What is fortune without health? --
Star-spangled tights --
Chapter 6: Feud with Dana: --
Renegade Jew --
Move on, Pulitzer! Part 4: Disaster: --
Chapter 1: Breakdown: --
Tortured nerves, failing eyesight --
Revenge on Dana --
Defying the doctors --
Chapter 2: Searching for health: --
Two world travelers --
Golden dome --
Exit cockerill --
Espionage --
Chapter 3: Editor in absentia: --
Interrogator --
Sacrificing pleasure --
No cards, no chess --
Chapter 4: Jones problem: --
Confusion in the dome --
Confusion in St Louis --
Chapter 5: Loneliest man in the world: --
Piggery nero, pigeon Nelson --
Roosevelt saloon crisis --
Smash the ring! --
Part 5: War With Hearst: --
Chapter 1: Persuasion by checkbook: --
How to crush gush --
Recruiting --
Chapter 2: Plague of Bryan: --
Hearst's burning money --
Damn your impertinence --
Business as usual --
Chapter 3: Cuba: --
Waiting for Phoebe --
Poisoned quail --
Imitating imitations --
Disagreeably agreeing --
Chapter 4: Journalistic dramaturgy: --
Flower of Cuba --
Hearst going broke? --
Exit Brisbane --
Checking on the staff --
Chapter 5: War and peace: --
Nearest approach to hell --
Losing money --
Normal newspaper --
Part 6: Schoolmaster: --
Chapter 1: Grooming the admiral: --
Gentleman wants companion --
Dewey says no --
Dewey says yes --
Chapter 2: Twentieth century: --
Stir him up, club him up --
Pursuing white mice --
Bird in a gilded cage --
Geranium and genuine --
Noisy eating --
Chapter 3: Eccentricities of Andes: --
Family circle --
Hire a man who gets drunk --
Judge of all the earth --
Mayor McClellan's shocker --
Rat fight --
Chapter 4: Fever of 1904: --
Two million for Columbia --
Discovering Frank Cobb --
Gush, guilder and glutinous --
Chapter 5: Insurance scandal: --
$644,000 failure --
Ball at Sherry's --
Don't be unnecessarily cruel --
Chapter 6: Nerves in tatters: --
Pulitzer-Vanderbilt entente --
Suspicion and despair --
Manners of a horse --
Utterly unreasonable --
Chapter 7: Artificial world: --
My long longed for friend --
Kicking Homer --
Complete control --
Unpresidential glutinous conduct --
Big drink of whiskey --
Chapter 8: Roosevelt vs Pulitzer: --
Intrigue over Panama --
My God! No proof! --
Big man of all newspapers --
Who got the money? --
Chapter 9: Pulitzer-and the press-victorious: --
No use, my dear boy --
Red thread --
Course in journalism --
Chapter 10: Last election: --
I've seen it all --
Don't paint the devil as black as he is --
Walking the tightrope --
Liberty-ha! --
Most people think I'm dead --
Afterword: Decline and fall --
Author's note and acknowledgments --
Notes --
Bibliography --
Index.
Responsibility: by W.A. Swanberg.

Abstract:

From the Blurb: This is the life-size portrait of a man of genius and an eccentric of unique proportions. Joseph Pulitzer revolutionized American journalism and exerted a powerful, progressive effect on American life. He did this by the force of a personality that was as admirable as it was outrageous. A Hungarian by birth, Joseph Pulitzer served briefly in the Civil War and then began his newspaper career in St. Louis. He started out penniless; when he died in 1911, he had made a great fortune, from the St. Louis Post-dispatch and the New York World (morning and evening). The Pulitzer newspapers-particularly the morning World-achieved a rare combination of wide popular appeal, brilliant and accurate reporting, and an enlightened and courageous editorial policy. Through his papers Pulitzer played an important role in American politics as he fought battle after battle with a reformer's zeal and a realist's shrewdness. Mr. Swanberg accomplishes three difficult things in Pulitzer. He vividly renders the social and political background. He shows precisely how Pulitzer made the World a great paper; how he fought his competitors, and how he affected the nation's affairs. The record, in Mr. Swanberg's hands, becomes an exciting, turbulent story. The third and most difficult accomplishment is the portrait of Joseph Pulitzer. A man of intellect and cultivation, Pulitzer was stricken in mid-career both by blindness and a nervous malady. The clink of a spoon at dinner, or a harsh voice, would cause him to explode in agony. He traveled constantly, usually on his yacht-"fleeing his nerves"--Accompanied by six male secretaries who had to be prepared to report on the latest art show in London or to discuss an obscure point in European history. Often separated from his wife by his travels, he was devoted to her and to their five children. He was a despot, given to thoughtful and generous acts. He was filled with self-pity, and his courage and energy were inexhaustible. Virtually every day as he roamed the world he poured advice, reprimand, and encouragement on his newspaper staff, all of its sparkling with the quality of the man. The superb biography does full justice to its extraordinary subject.

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schema:description"List of illustrations -- Part 1: Angry Young Man: -- Chapter 1: Westward ho!: -- Goat of Company L -- Unburied corpses -- Search for independence -- Chapter 2: Bitten by politics: -- Murderous intent -- Breaking with Grant -- Chapter 3: Right hand of Schurz: -- Dream of reform -- Cincinnati fiasco -- Stumping for Greeley -- Republican turns democrat -- Chapter 4: Love on the run: -- Resolute Pulitzer, irresolute Tilden -- Not worthy of such love -- Uncertain and inconstant -- Politician's honeymoon -- Part 2: Sensationalist: -- Chapter 1: How to win circulation: -- Colossal nerve -- Pistol-packing editor -- Chapter 2: Road to power: -- Electionitis -- Beaten by the bourbons -- Loudest voice on the Mississippi -- Chapter 3: Unwelcome in St Louis: -- Killing at the post-dispatch -- Gentlemen, a change has taken place -- Part 3: Triumph: -- Chapter 1: Reformer and salesman: -- New social conscience -- Democrats, unite! -- Bucking the establishment -- Chapter 2: Electing a president: -- Defection of Dana -- Ma! Ma! Where's my pa? -- Burn this letter! -- Chapter 3: Disenchantment: -- Walking the bowery -- Office seekers -- Rescuing the goddess -- Creative mental power -- Looking for suggestive men -- Chapter 4: Nerves on edge: -- Profane philanthropist -- Four-month congressman -- Boodling Aldermen -- Electing a mayor -- Chapter 5: Spinning like a top: -- Democrat in Babylon -- What is fortune without health? -- Star-spangled tights -- Chapter 6: Feud with Dana: -- Renegade Jew -- Move on, Pulitzer!"@en
schema:description"From the Blurb: This is the life-size portrait of a man of genius and an eccentric of unique proportions. Joseph Pulitzer revolutionized American journalism and exerted a powerful, progressive effect on American life. He did this by the force of a personality that was as admirable as it was outrageous. A Hungarian by birth, Joseph Pulitzer served briefly in the Civil War and then began his newspaper career in St. Louis. He started out penniless; when he died in 1911, he had made a great fortune, from the St. Louis Post-dispatch and the New York World (morning and evening). The Pulitzer newspapers-particularly the morning World-achieved a rare combination of wide popular appeal, brilliant and accurate reporting, and an enlightened and courageous editorial policy. Through his papers Pulitzer played an important role in American politics as he fought battle after battle with a reformer's zeal and a realist's shrewdness. Mr. Swanberg accomplishes three difficult things in Pulitzer. He vividly renders the social and political background. He shows precisely how Pulitzer made the World a great paper; how he fought his competitors, and how he affected the nation's affairs. The record, in Mr. Swanberg's hands, becomes an exciting, turbulent story. The third and most difficult accomplishment is the portrait of Joseph Pulitzer. A man of intellect and cultivation, Pulitzer was stricken in mid-career both by blindness and a nervous malady. The clink of a spoon at dinner, or a harsh voice, would cause him to explode in agony. He traveled constantly, usually on his yacht-"fleeing his nerves"--Accompanied by six male secretaries who had to be prepared to report on the latest art show in London or to discuss an obscure point in European history. Often separated from his wife by his travels, he was devoted to her and to their five children. He was a despot, given to thoughtful and generous acts. He was filled with self-pity, and his courage and energy were inexhaustible. Virtually every day as he roamed the world he poured advice, reprimand, and encouragement on his newspaper staff, all of its sparkling with the quality of the man. The superb biography does full justice to its extraordinary subject."@en
schema:description"Part 4: Disaster: -- Chapter 1: Breakdown: -- Tortured nerves, failing eyesight -- Revenge on Dana -- Defying the doctors -- Chapter 2: Searching for health: -- Two world travelers -- Golden dome -- Exit cockerill -- Espionage -- Chapter 3: Editor in absentia: -- Interrogator -- Sacrificing pleasure -- No cards, no chess -- Chapter 4: Jones problem: -- Confusion in the dome -- Confusion in St Louis -- Chapter 5: Loneliest man in the world: -- Piggery nero, pigeon Nelson -- Roosevelt saloon crisis -- Smash the ring! -- Part 5: War With Hearst: -- Chapter 1: Persuasion by checkbook: -- How to crush gush -- Recruiting -- Chapter 2: Plague of Bryan: -- Hearst's burning money -- Damn your impertinence -- Business as usual -- Chapter 3: Cuba: -- Waiting for Phoebe -- Poisoned quail -- Imitating imitations -- Disagreeably agreeing -- Chapter 4: Journalistic dramaturgy: -- Flower of Cuba -- Hearst going broke? -- Exit Brisbane -- Checking on the staff -- Chapter 5: War and peace: -- Nearest approach to hell -- Losing money -- Normal newspaper -- Part 6: Schoolmaster: -- Chapter 1: Grooming the admiral: -- Gentleman wants companion -- Dewey says no -- Dewey says yes -- Chapter 2: Twentieth century: -- Stir him up, club him up -- Pursuing white mice -- Bird in a gilded cage -- Geranium and genuine -- Noisy eating -- Chapter 3: Eccentricities of Andes: -- Family circle -- Hire a man who gets drunk -- Judge of all the earth -- Mayor McClellan's shocker -- Rat fight -- Chapter 4: Fever of 1904: -- Two million for Columbia -- Discovering Frank Cobb -- Gush, guilder and glutinous -- Chapter 5: Insurance scandal: -- $644,000 failure -- Ball at Sherry's -- Don't be unnecessarily cruel -- Chapter 6: Nerves in tatters: -- Pulitzer-Vanderbilt entente -- Suspicion and despair -- Manners of a horse -- Utterly unreasonable -- Chapter 7: Artificial world: -- My long longed for friend -- Kicking Homer -- Complete control -- Unpresidential glutinous conduct -- Big drink of whiskey -- Chapter 8: Roosevelt vs Pulitzer: -- Intrigue over Panama -- My God! No proof! -- Big man of all newspapers -- Who got the money? -- Chapter 9: Pulitzer-and the press-victorious: -- No use, my dear boy -- Red thread -- Course in journalism -- Chapter 10: Last election: -- I've seen it all -- Don't paint the devil as black as he is -- Walking the tightrope -- Liberty-ha! -- Most people think I'm dead -- Afterword: Decline and fall -- Author's note and acknowledgments -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index."@en
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