skip to content
Pushed Out
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Pushed Out

Author: Rhonda Brownstein
Publisher: Southern Poverty Law Center. 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104. Tel: 334-956-8200; Fax: 334-956-8484; Web site: http://www.tolerance.org/teach/magazine/index.jsp
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Teaching Tolerance, n36 p58-61 Fall 2009
Database:ERIC The ERIC database is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Education.
Summary:
Significant numbers of students are being pushed out of school as a result of "zero tolerance" school discipline policies. While nobody questions the need to keep schools safe, teachers, students, and parents are questioning the methods being used in pursuit of that goal. Initially enacted to counter violent behavior and drug use, zero tolerance school disciplinary policies have expanded to cover more minor  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

More like this

 

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving;

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Rhonda Brownstein
ISSN:1066-2847
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 503326639
Awards:
Description: 4

Abstract:

Significant numbers of students are being pushed out of school as a result of "zero tolerance" school discipline policies. While nobody questions the need to keep schools safe, teachers, students, and parents are questioning the methods being used in pursuit of that goal. Initially enacted to counter violent behavior and drug use, zero tolerance school disciplinary policies have expanded to cover more minor misbehavior. As a result, the U.S. has experienced dramatic increases in the number of students suspended, expelled and referred to law enforcement for school-based incidents. These practices are paving the way for higher dropout rates and involvement in the criminal justice system, a pathway often referred to as the "school-to-prison pipeline." Likewise, these practices have been shown to worsen the climates of the schools, leading to teacher burnout. More than 9,000 schools across the country are trying to curb the pushout problem by implementing Positive Behavior Supports (PBS), an evidence-based, data-driven approach proven to reduce disciplinary incidents, increase a school's sense of safety, improve attendance rates and support improved academic outcomes. PBS is just part of the solution to the pushout problem. School administrators need alternatives to exclusionary school discipline practices, such as "behavior contracts," community service, after-school detention, loss of a privilege, in-school suspension, and a "Check & Connect" program. Fixing school discipline is not an impossible task. The first step, for teachers and administrators, is to recognize their own power. Working together, teachers, administrators and parents can create safe and orderly classrooms where class time is spent on instruction, not wasted on ineffective discipline.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

All user tags (7)

View most popular tags as: tag list | tag cloud

Similar Items

User lists with this item (1)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/503326639>
library:oclcnum"503326639"
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/503326639>
rdf:typeschema:Article
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2009-09-98"
schema:description"Significant numbers of students are being pushed out of school as a result of "zero tolerance" school discipline policies. While nobody questions the need to keep schools safe, teachers, students, and parents are questioning the methods being used in pursuit of that goal. Initially enacted to counter violent behavior and drug use, zero tolerance school disciplinary policies have expanded to cover more minor misbehavior. As a result, the U.S. has experienced dramatic increases in the number of students suspended, expelled and referred to law enforcement for school-based incidents. These practices are paving the way for higher dropout rates and involvement in the criminal justice system, a pathway often referred to as the "school-to-prison pipeline." Likewise, these practices have been shown to worsen the climates of the schools, leading to teacher burnout. More than 9,000 schools across the country are trying to curb the pushout problem by implementing Positive Behavior Supports (PBS), an evidence-based, data-driven approach proven to reduce disciplinary incidents, increase a school's sense of safety, improve attendance rates and support improved academic outcomes. PBS is just part of the solution to the pushout problem. School administrators need alternatives to exclusionary school discipline practices, such as "behavior contracts," community service, after-school detention, loss of a privilege, in-school suspension, and a "Check & Connect" program. Fixing school discipline is not an impossible task. The first step, for teachers and administrators, is to recognize their own power. Working together, teachers, administrators and parents can create safe and orderly classrooms where class time is spent on instruction, not wasted on ineffective discipline."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/376091184>
schema:isPartOf
schema:isPartOf
schema:name"Pushed Out"
schema:pageStart"58"
schema:publisher
<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/376091184#Agent/southern_poverty_law_center_400_washington_avenue_montgomery_al_36104_tel_334_956_8200_fax_334_956_8484_web_site_http_www_tolerance_org_teach_magazine_index_jsp>
rdf:typej.0:Agent
schema:name"Southern Poverty Law Center. 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104. Tel: 334-956-8200; Fax: 334-956-8484; Web site: http://www.tolerance.org/teach/magazine/index.jsp"
schema:url

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.