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Quanah Parker, Comanche chief

Author: William T Hagan
Publisher: Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, ©1993.
Series: Oklahoma western biographies, v. 6.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Quanah Parker is a figure of almost mythical proportions on the Southern Plains. The son of Cynthia Parker, a white captive whose subsequent return to white society and early death had become a Texas frontier legend, Quanah rose from able warrior to tribal leader on the Comanche reservation. Other books about Quanah Parker have been incomplete, are outdated, or are lacking in scholarly analysis. William T. Hagan,  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
History
Named Person: Quanah Parker; Quanah Parker; Quanah Parker
Material Type: Biography, Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: William T Hagan
ISBN: 0806124938 9780806124933 0806127724 9780806127729
OCLC Number: 26396140
Description: xvi, 141 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Contents: 1. Life on the Plains --
2. Quanah's New World --
3. Quanah and the Cattlemen --
4. Following the White Man's Road --
5. Peyote Advocate and Ghost Dance Critic --
6. A Tough but Realistic Negotiator --
7. High Tide for Quanah --
8. Trying to Stave Off Disaster --
9. Adapting to the New Order.
Series Title: Oklahoma western biographies, v. 6.
Responsibility: by William T. Hagan.
More information:

Abstract:

Quanah Parker is a figure of almost mythical proportions on the Southern Plains. The son of Cynthia Parker, a white captive whose subsequent return to white society and early death had become a Texas frontier legend, Quanah rose from able warrior to tribal leader on the Comanche reservation. Other books about Quanah Parker have been incomplete, are outdated, or are lacking in scholarly analysis. William T. Hagan, the author of United States-Comanche Relations, knows Comanche history. This new biography, written in a crisp and readable style, is a well-balanced portrait of Quanah Parker, the chief, and Quanah, the man torn between two worlds. Between 1875 and his death in 1911, Quanah strove to cope with the changes confronting tribal members. Dealing with local Indian agents and with presidents and other high officials in Washington, he faced the classic dilemma of a leader caught between the dictates of an occupying power and the wrenching physical and spiritual needs of his people. Quanah was never one to decline the perquisites of leadership. Texas cattlemen who used his influence to gain access to reservation grass for their herds rewarded him liberally. They financed some of his many trips to Washington and helped him build a home that remains to this day a tourist attraction. Such was his fame that Teddy Roosevelt invited him to take part in his inaugural parade and subsequently intervened personally to help him and the Comanches as their reservation dissolved. Maintaining a remarkable blend of progressive and traditional beliefs, Quanah epitomized the Indian caught in the middle. Valued by almost all Indian agents with whom he dealt, he nevertheless practiced polygamy and the peyote religion - both contrary to government policy. Other Indians functioned as middlemen, but through his force and intelligence, and his romantic origins, Quanah Parker achieved unparalleled success and enduring renown. -- Publisher description

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