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Queer virgins and virgin queans on the early modern stage

Author: Mary Bly
Publisher: Oxford [U.K.] ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Queer Virgins and Virgin Queans looks at the early modern theatre through the lens of obscure and obscene puns - especially 'queer' puns, those that carry homoerotic resonances and speak to homoerotic desires. In particular, it resurrects the operations of a small boys' company known as the first Whitefriars, which performed for about nine months in 1607-8." "Queer Virgins and Virgin Queens engages with linguistic  Read more...
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Named Person: William Shakespeare
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Mary Bly
ISBN: 0198186991 9780198186991
OCLC Number: 43334143
Description: viii, 213 p. ; 22 cm.
Contents: 1. Bawdy Virgins and Queer Puns --
2. Licence Taken: Borrowed Prurience and the First Whitefriars Company --
3. Punning Eroticisms --
4. Sodomy in the Literary Terrain: Readers and Reading Pleasures --
5. Homoerotic Puns and Queer Collaborations.
Responsibility: Mary Bly.
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Abstract:

This study looks at the early modern theatre through the lens of obscure and obscene puns - especially "queer" puns, those that carry homoerotic resonances and speak to homoerotic desires. In  Read more...

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One is left very much better informed about the boys of Whitefriars and the men who marketed them. Bly's style is swift and sure and her insights into early modern sexual economics shrewd. Any Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""Queer Virgins and Virgin Queans looks at the early modern theatre through the lens of obscure and obscene puns - especially 'queer' puns, those that carry homoerotic resonances and speak to homoerotic desires. In particular, it resurrects the operations of a small boys' company known as the first Whitefriars, which performed for about nine months in 1607-8." "Queer Virgins and Virgin Queens engages with linguistic theory by arguing that puns create communities, if only for a few hours; with theatrical scholarship by arguing for a much stronger emphasis on the importance of the writing communities attached to theatres; and with queer theory by positing a self-aware homoerotic community in early modern London."--BOOK JACKET."
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