skip to content
The r-unit at 320 and 160 Mev Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The r-unit at 320 and 160 Mev

Author: Edwin M McMillan; Wade Blocker; Robert W Kenney; U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.; Lawrence Radiation Laboratory.
Publisher: Oak Ridge, Tenn. : U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Technical Information Service, 1950.
Series: UCRL (Series), 1004.
Edition/Format:   Book : National government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The r-unit is used today in at least two different ways: as a measure of radiation dosage, and as a measure of x-ray intensity. The meaning of the former is fairly well defined in terms of energy absorbed per gram of tissue, and the standard thimble chambers are calibrated to read in these terms. The meaning of the latter is much less clear. As originally defined, the r-unit referred to the ionization in air due to  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Additional Physical Format: Online version:
McMillan, Edwin M. (Edwin Mattison), 1907-
R-unit at 320 and 160 Mev.
Oak Ridge, Tenn. : U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Technical Information Service, 1950
(OCoLC)852767089
Material Type: Government publication, National government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Edwin M McMillan; Wade Blocker; Robert W Kenney; U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.; Lawrence Radiation Laboratory.
OCLC Number: 796815662
Notes: "November 10, 1950."
Work performed at the Radiation Laboratory, University of California.
Description: 5 p. ; 28 cm.
Series Title: UCRL (Series), 1004.
Other Titles: Technical Report Archive & Image Library (TRAIL)
Responsibility: By Edwin M. McMillan, Wade Blocker [and] Robert W. Kenney/

Abstract:

The r-unit is used today in at least two different ways: as a measure of radiation dosage, and as a measure of x-ray intensity. The meaning of the former is fairly well defined in terms of energy absorbed per gram of tissue, and the standard thimble chambers are calibrated to read in these terms. The meaning of the latter is much less clear. As originally defined, the r-unit referred to the ionization in air due to secondary electrons in equilibrium with the primary beam of x-rays. With low-energy x-rays equilibrium is easily attained since the range of the secondaries is small compared with the absorption distance of the primaries in air, but with high-energy-x-rays this is no longer true. Since a clearly defined equilibrium no longer exists, the old definition must be abandoned and the question remains: what should the r-unit mean in connection with the intensity of a beam of high-energy x-rays?

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/796815662>
library:oclcnum"796815662"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdf:valueUnknown value: ngp
rdf:valueUnknown value: gpb
rdfs:seeAlso
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1950"
schema:description"The r-unit is used today in at least two different ways: as a measure of radiation dosage, and as a measure of x-ray intensity. The meaning of the former is fairly well defined in terms of energy absorbed per gram of tissue, and the standard thimble chambers are calibrated to read in these terms. The meaning of the latter is much less clear. As originally defined, the r-unit referred to the ionization in air due to secondary electrons in equilibrium with the primary beam of x-rays. With low-energy x-rays equilibrium is easily attained since the range of the secondaries is small compared with the absorption distance of the primaries in air, but with high-energy-x-rays this is no longer true. Since a clearly defined equilibrium no longer exists, the old definition must be abandoned and the question remains: what should the r-unit mean in connection with the intensity of a beam of high-energy x-rays?"
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1367645106>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:isPartOf
schema:name"The r-unit at 320 and 160 Mev"
schema:numberOfPages"5"
schema:publication
schema:publisher
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.