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The rambler

Author: Samuel Johnson; Walter Jackson Bate; Albrecht B Strauss
Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, ©1969.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Samuel Johnson; Walter Jackson Bate; Albrecht B Strauss
ISBN: 0300011571 9780300011579
OCLC Number: 3389115
Description: 3 volumes : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Contents: III. Difficulty of the first address. Practice of the epic poets. Convenience of periodical performances --
The necessity and danger of looking into futurity.Writers naturally sanguine. Their hopes liable to disappointment --
An allegory on criticism --
The modern form of romances preferable to the ancient. The necessity of characters morally good --
A meditation on the spring --
Happiness not local --
Retirement natural to a great mind. Its religious use --
The thoughts to be brought under regulation; as they respect the past, present, and future --
The fondness of every man for his profession. The gradual improvement of manufactures --
Four billets with their answers. Remarks on masquerades --
The folly of anger. The misery of a peevish old-age--
The history of a young woman that came to London for a service --
The duty of secresy. The invalidity of all excuses for betraying secrets --
The difference between an author's writings and his conversation --
The folly of cards. A letter from a lady that has lost her money --
The dangers and miseries of literary eminence --
The frequent contemplation of death necessary to moderate the passions --
The unhappiness of marriage caused by irregular motives of choice --
The danger of ranging from one study to another. The importance of the early choice of a profession --
The folly and inconvenience of affectation --
The anxieties of literature not less than those of public stations. The inequality of author's writings --
An allegory on wit and learning --
The contrariety of criticism. The vanity of objection. An author obliged to depend upon his own judgment --
The necessity of attending to the duties of common life. The natural character not to be forsaken --
Rashness preferable to cowardice. Enterprize not to be repressed --
The mischief of extravagance, and misery of dependance --
An author's treatment from six patrons --
The various arts of self delusion --
The folly of anticipating misfortunes --
The observance of Sunday recommended; an allegory --
The defence of a known mistake highly culpable --
The vanity of stoicism. The necessity of patience --
An allegorical history of rest and labour --
The uneasiness and disgust of female cowardice --
A marriage of prudence without affection --
The reasons why pastorals delight --
The true principles of pastoral poetry --
The advantages of mediocrity. An Eastern fable --
The unhappiness of women, whether single or married --
The difficulty of giving advice without offending --
The advantages of memory --
The misery of a modish lady in solitude --
The inconveniences of precipitation and confidence --
Religion and superstition, a vision --
The causes of disagreement in marriage --
The mischiefs of rural faction --
The proper means of regulating sorrow --
The miseries of an infirm constitution --
A disquisition upon the value of fame --
A virtuous old age always reverenced --
The employments of a housewife in the country --
The contemplation of the calamities of others, a remedy for grief --
The folly and misery of a spendthrift --
A death-bed the true school of wisdom. The effects of death upon the survivors --
The gay widow's impatience of the growth of her daughter. The history of Miss May-pole --
The necessity of complaisance. The Rambler's grief for offending his correspondents --
Sententious rules of frugality --
The desire of wealth moderated by philosophy --
An account of Suspirius the human screech-owl --
The dignity and usefulness of biography --
A Londoner's visit to the country --
A young lady's impatience to see London --
Inconstancy not always a weakness --
The requisites to true friendship --
Obidah and the hermit, an Eastern story --
Passion not to be eradicated. The views of women ill directed --
The garden of hope, a dream --
Every man chiefly happy or miserable at home. The opinion of servants not to be despised --
The miseries and prejudices of old-age. IV. Different men virtuous in different degrees. The vicious not always abandoned --
No man believes that his own life will be short --
The necessity of good-humour --
The lingering expectation of an heir --
Peevishness equally wretched and offensive; The character of Tetrica --
The world never known but by a change of fortune. The history of Melissa --
The arts by which bad men are reconciled to themselves --
The learned seldom despised but when they deserve contempt --
The power of novelty. Mortality too familiar to raise apprehensions --
A suspicious man justly suspected --
Variety necessary to happiness. A winter scene --
The great rule of action. Debts of justice to be distinguished from debts of charity --
The virtuoso's account of his rarities --
The virtuoso's curiosity justified --
A young lady's impatience of controul --
The mischiefs of total idleness --
The danger of succeeding a great author. An introduction to a criticism on Milton's versification --
The reasons why advice is generally ineffectual --
A criticism on Milton's versification. Elisions dangerous in English poetry --
The luxury of vain imagination --
The pauses in English poetry adjusted --
The conduct of patronage, an allegory --
The accommodation of sound to sense often chimerical.--
The prejudices and caprices of criticism --
An inquiry how far Milton has accommodated the sound to the sense --
The history of Pertinax the sceptic --
Truth, falshood, and fiction, an allegory --
Advice to unmarried ladies --
The necessity of cultivating politeness --
The pleasures of private friendship. The necessity of similar dispositions --
Modish pleasures --
A proper audience necessary to a wit --
The voyage of life --
The prevalence of curiosity. The character of Nugaculus --
The original of flattery. The meanness of venal praise --
The universal register, a dream --
The vanity of an author's expectations. Reasons why good authors are sometimes neglected --
Properantia's hopes of a year of confusion. The misery of prostitutes --
Life sufficient to all purposes if well employed --
The education of a fop --
Repentance stated and explained. Retirement and abstinence useful to repentance --
Youth made unfortunate by its haste and eagerness --
Too much nicety not to be indulged. The character of Eriphile --
The history of Hymenaeus's courtship --
The necessity of proportioning punishments to crimes --
The sequel of Hymenaeus's courtship --
The young trader's attempt at politeness --
The advantages of living in a garret --
The narrowness of fame --
Tranquilla's account of her lovers opposed to Hymenaeus --
The history of Almamoulin, the son of Nouradin --
The dangers of imitation. The impropriety of imitating Spenser --
A criticism on the English historians --
The young trader turned gentleman --
The ladies' misery in a summer-retirement --
The difficulty of defining comedy. Tragic and comic sentiments confounded --
The universality of cowardice. The impropriety of extorting praise. The impertinence of an astronomer --
Diligence too soon relaxed. Necessity of perseverance --
Anxiety universal. The unhappiness of a wit and a fine lady --
The folly of cowardice and inactivity --
The history of a beauty --
Desire of gain the general passion --
The difficulty of educating a young nobleman --
The miseries of a beauty defaced --
Idleness an anxious and miserable state --
The folly of annual retreats into the country --
The meanness and mischiefs of indiscriminate dedication --
The necessity of literary courage --
Original characters to be found in the country. The character of Mrs. Busy --
A critical examination of Samson Agonistes --
The criticism continued --
The danger of attempting wit in conversation. The character of Papilius --
An account of squire Bluster --
The criterions of plagiarism. V. The difficulty of raising reputation. The various species of detractors --
Petty writers not to be despised --
An account of an author travelling in quest of his own character. The uncertainty of fame --
The courtier's esteem of assurance --
The cruelty of parental tyranny --
Benefits not always entitled to gratitude --
Adversity useful to the acquisition of knowledge --
The climacterics of the mind --
Criticism on epistolary writings --
The treatment incurred by loss of fortune --
The inefficacy of genius without learning --
The usefulness of advice. The danger of habits. The necessity of reviewing life --
The laws of writing not always indisputable. A vindication of tragi-comedy --
The scholar's complaint of his own bashfulness --
Rules of writing drawn from examples. Those examples often mistaken --
The nature and remedies of bashfulness --
Rules for the choice of associates --
The revolutions of a garret --
Old men in danger of falling into pupillage. The conduct of Thrasybulus --
The mischiefs of following a patron --
Praise universally desired. The failings of eminent men often imitated --
The impotence of wealth. The visit of Serotinus to the place of his nativity --
Favour not easily gained by the poor --
The marriage of Hymenaeus and Tranquilla --
Poetry debased by mean expressions. An example from Shakespear --
Labour necessary to excellence --
The history of Misella debauched by her relation --
Misella's description of the life of a prostitute --
The effect of sudden riches upon the manners --
Unreasonable fears of pedantry --
The mischiefs of unbounded raillery. History of Dicaculus --
The majority are wicked --
Directions to authors attacked by critics. The various degrees of critical perspicacity --
An account of a club of antiquaries --
Many advantages not to be enjoyed together --
The aukward merriment of a student --
The study of life not to be neglected for the sake of books --
The history of an adventurer in lotteries --
The history of Leviculus, the fortune-hunter --
The influence of envy and interest compared --
The subject of essays often suggested by chance. Chance equally prevalent in other affairs --
The prohibition of revenge justifiable by reason. The meanness of regulating our conduct by the opinions of men --
Anningait and Ajut, a Greenland history --
The history of Anningait and Ajut concluded --
Favour often gained with little assistance from understanding --
The mischiefs of falshood. The character of Turpicula --
The history of Abouzaid, the son of Morad --
The busy life of a young lady --
Love unsuccessful without riches --
The author's art of praising himself --
A young nobleman's progress in politeness --
A young nobleman's introduction to the knowledge of the town --
Human opinions mutable. The hopes of youth fallacious --
The history of a legacy-hunter --
The legacy-hunter's history concluded --
The virtues of Rabbi Abraham's magnet --
Asper's complaint of the insolence of Prospero. Unpoliteness not always the effect of pride --
The importance of punctuality --
The different acceptations of poverty. Cynics and monks not poor --
The pleasures of life to be sought in prospects of futurity. Future fame uncertain --
The history of ten days of Seged, emperor of Ethiopia --
The history of Seged concluded --
The art of living at the cost of others --
The folly of continuing too long upon the stage --
The Rambler's reception. His design.
Responsibility: Samuel Johnson ; edited by W.J. Bate and Albrecht B. Strauss.

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Primary Entity

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