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Reading daughters' fictions, 1709-1834 : novels and society from Manley to Edgeworth

Auteur : Caroline Gonda
Éditeur : Cambridge [England] ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1996.
Collection : Cambridge studies in Romanticism, 19.
Édition/format :   Livre : AnglaisVoir toutes les éditions et les formats
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
It has been argued that the eighteenth century witnessed a decline in paternal authority, and the emergence of more intimate, affectionate relationships between parent and child. In Reading Daughters' Fictions, Caroline Gonda draws on a wide range of novels and non-literary materials from the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, in order to examine changing representations of the father-daughter bond. She  Lire la suite...
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Détails

Genre/forme : Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Personne nommée : Manley, Mrs.; Maria Edgeworth; Manley, Mrs.; Maria Edgeworth; Maria Edgeworth; Manley, Mrs.
Type d’ouvrage : Ressource Internet
Format : Livre, Ressource Internet
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : Caroline Gonda
ISBN : 0521553954 9780521553957
Numéro OCLC : 32746634
Description : xx, 287 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contenu : 1. Fictions of accident? Representations of incest in Manley, Barker and Haywood --
2. Amorous girls and tyrannical parents: Richardson and the limits of paternal authority --
Interlude. A Lady's Legacy: Sarah Scott and tests of filial duty --
3. Lessons of experience: Evelina and Camilla --
4. Schedoniac contours: the Sins of the Fathers in Gothic fiction --
5. Stepping out: from Elizabeth Inchbald to Mary Brunton --
6. Her father's daughter? The life and fictions of Maria Edgeworth.
Titre de collection : Cambridge studies in Romanticism, 19.
Responsabilité : Caroline Gonda.
Plus d’informations :

Résumé :

It has been argued that the eighteenth century witnessed a decline in paternal authority, and the emergence of more intimate, affectionate relationships between parent and child. In Reading Daughters' Fictions, Caroline Gonda draws on a wide range of novels and non-literary materials from the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, in order to examine changing representations of the father-daughter bond. She shows that heroine-centred novels, aimed at a predominantly female readership, had an important part to play in female socialization and the construction of heterosexuality, in which the father-daughter relationship had a central role. Contemporary diatribes against novels claimed that reading fiction produced rebellious daughters, fallen women, and nervous female wrecks. Gonda's study of novels of family life and courtship suggests that, far from corrupting the female reader, such fictions helped to maintain rather than undermine familial and social order.

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