aller au contenu
Recycling reconsidered : the present failure and future promise of environmental action in the United States Aperçu de cet ouvrage
FermerAperçu de cet ouvrage
Vérifiant…

Recycling reconsidered : the present failure and future promise of environmental action in the United States

Auteur : Samantha MacBride
Éditeur : Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, ©2012.
Collection : Urban and industrial environments.
Édition/format :   Livre : AnglaisVoir toutes les éditions et les formats
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
Recycling is widely celebrated as an environmental success story. The accomplishments of the recycling movement can be seen in municipal practice, a thriving private recycling industry, and widespread public support and participation. In the United States, more people recycle than vote. But, as Samantha MacBride points out in this book, the goals of recycling--saving the earth (and trees), conserving resources, and  Lire la suite...
Évaluation :

(pas encore évalué) 0 avec des critiques - Soyez le premier.

Sujets
Plus comme ceci

 

Trouver un exemplaire en ligne

Liens vers cet ouvrage

Trouver un exemplaire dans la bibliothèque

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Recherche de bibliothèques qui possèdent cet ouvrage...

Détails

Type d’ouvrage : Ressource Internet
Format : Livre, Ressource Internet
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : Samantha MacBride
ISBN : 9780262016001 0262016001 9780262516433 0262516438
Numéro OCLC : 700037609
Description : xii, 303 p. ; 24 cm.
Contenu : Introduction --
Rags and bottles --
Curbside recycling collection --
Tonnage and toxicity : the nonissue of nonhazardous industrial waste --
Scale and sufficiency : zero waste and the quest for environmental justice --
Extended plastics responsibility : producers as reluctant stewards --
Conclusion --
Appendix 1 : Summary of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data on solid-waste generation, disposal, and recycling in the United States --
Appendix 2 : Summary of textile and glass disposal and recycling in the United States and New York City --
Appendix 3 : Changes in quantity and composition of municipal solid waste over time --
Appendix 4 : Fractions of municipal solid waste suitable for reuse using a model of repair, refurbishment, and retailing --
Appendix 5 : Details on various quantities of different plastics in municipal solid waste --
Appendix 6 : Fractions of municipal solid waste referred to in the conclusion.
Titre de collection : Urban and industrial environments.
Responsabilité : Samantha MacBride.

Résumé :

Recycling is widely celebrated as an environmental success story. The accomplishments of the recycling movement can be seen in municipal practice, a thriving private recycling industry, and widespread public support and participation. In the United States, more people recycle than vote. But, as Samantha MacBride points out in this book, the goals of recycling--saving the earth (and trees), conserving resources, and greening the economy--are still far from being realized. The vast majority of solid wastes are still burned or buried. MacBride argues that, since the emergence of the recycling movement in 1970, manufacturers of products that end up in waste have successfully prevented the implementation of more onerous, yet far more effective, forms of sustainable waste policy. Recycling as we know it today generates the illusion of progress while allowing industry to maintain the status quo and place responsibility on consumers and local government. Most disturbingly, it does so with the strong support of environmental social movements that defend recycling even as they grapple with its shortcomings. MacBride offers a series of case studies in recycling that pose provocative questions about whether the current ways we deal with waste are really the best ways to bring about real sustainability and environmental justice. MacBride does not aim to debunk or discourage recycling but to help us think beyond recycling as it is today. In the name of ecological citizenship, she challenges us to consider larger problems of solid waste, the global range of environmental threats, and policy alternatives that go beyond curbside collection of cans, bottles, and paper.

Critiques

Critiques éditoriales

Synopsis de l’éditeur

MacBride provides an excellent historical overview of the U.S. recycling efforts, their limitations and the opportunities to improve recycling determinations in the future. This work is of great Lire la suite...

 
Critiques d’utilisateurs
Récupération des critiques de GoodReads...
Récuperation des critiques DOGObooks…

Tags

Soyez le premier.

Ouvrages semblables

Confirmez cette demande

Vous avez peut-être déjà demandé cet ouvrage. Veuillez sélectionner OK si vous voulez poursuivre avec cette demande quand même.

Données liées


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/700037609>
library:oclcnum"700037609"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:MediaObject
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1092888>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Refuse and refuse disposal"@en
schema:name"Refuse and refuse disposal."@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1092017>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Recycling (Waste, etc.)--Government policy"@en
schema:name"Recycling (Waste, etc.)--Government policy."@en
schema:about
schema:copyrightYear"2012"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2012"
schema:description"Recycling is widely celebrated as an environmental success story. The accomplishments of the recycling movement can be seen in municipal practice, a thriving private recycling industry, and widespread public support and participation. In the United States, more people recycle than vote. But, as Samantha MacBride points out in this book, the goals of recycling--saving the earth (and trees), conserving resources, and greening the economy--are still far from being realized. The vast majority of solid wastes are still burned or buried. MacBride argues that, since the emergence of the recycling movement in 1970, manufacturers of products that end up in waste have successfully prevented the implementation of more onerous, yet far more effective, forms of sustainable waste policy. Recycling as we know it today generates the illusion of progress while allowing industry to maintain the status quo and place responsibility on consumers and local government. Most disturbingly, it does so with the strong support of environmental social movements that defend recycling even as they grapple with its shortcomings. MacBride offers a series of case studies in recycling that pose provocative questions about whether the current ways we deal with waste are really the best ways to bring about real sustainability and environmental justice. MacBride does not aim to debunk or discourage recycling but to help us think beyond recycling as it is today. In the name of ecological citizenship, she challenges us to consider larger problems of solid waste, the global range of environmental threats, and policy alternatives that go beyond curbside collection of cans, bottles, and paper."@en
schema:description"Introduction -- Rags and bottles -- Curbside recycling collection -- Tonnage and toxicity : the nonissue of nonhazardous industrial waste -- Scale and sufficiency : zero waste and the quest for environmental justice -- Extended plastics responsibility : producers as reluctant stewards -- Conclusion -- Appendix 1 : Summary of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data on solid-waste generation, disposal, and recycling in the United States -- Appendix 2 : Summary of textile and glass disposal and recycling in the United States and New York City -- Appendix 3 : Changes in quantity and composition of municipal solid waste over time -- Appendix 4 : Fractions of municipal solid waste suitable for reuse using a model of repair, refurbishment, and retailing -- Appendix 5 : Details on various quantities of different plastics in municipal solid waste -- Appendix 6 : Fractions of municipal solid waste referred to in the conclusion."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/774467047>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:isPartOf
schema:name"Recycling reconsidered : the present failure and future promise of environmental action in the United States"@en
schema:numberOfPages"303"
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:workExample
schema:workExample
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Fermer la fenêtre

Veuillez vous identifier dans WorldCat 

Vous n’avez pas de compte? Vous pouvez facilement créer un compte gratuit.