skip to content
Red-hot and righteous : the urban religion of the Salvation Army Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Red-hot and righteous : the urban religion of the Salvation Army

Author: Diane H Winston
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1999.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In this engrossing study of religion, urban life, and commercial culture, Diane Winston shows how a (self-styled "red-hot") militant Protestant mission established a beachhead in the modern city. When The Salvation Army, a British evangelical movement, landed in New York in 1880, local citizens called its eye-catching advertisements "vulgar" and dubbed its brass bands, female preachers, and overheated services  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Winston, Diane H., 1951-
Red-hot and righteous.
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1999
(OCoLC)607198816
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Diane H Winston
ISBN: 0674867068 9780674867062
OCLC Number: 40249764
Description: 290 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Cathedral of the open air, 1880-1886 --
New woman, 1886-1896 --
Red Crusade, 1896-1904 --
Commander in Rags, 1904-1918 --
Fires of faith, 1919-1950.
Responsibility: Diane Winston.

Abstract:

"In this engrossing study of religion, urban life, and commercial culture, Diane Winston shows how a (self-styled "red-hot") militant Protestant mission established a beachhead in the modern city. When The Salvation Army, a British evangelical movement, landed in New York in 1880, local citizens called its eye-catching advertisements "vulgar" and dubbed its brass bands, female preachers, and overheated services "sensationalist." Yet a little more than a century later this ragtag missionary movement had evolved into the nation's largest charitable fund-raiser - the very exemplar of America's most cherished values of social service and religious commitment." "Winston illustrates how the Army borrowed the forms and idioms of popular entertainments, commercial emporiums, and master marketers to deliver its message. In contrast to histories that relegate religion to the sidelines of urban society, she shows that Salvationists were at the center of debates about social services for the urban poor, the changing position of women, and the evolution of a consumer culture."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/40249764>
library:oclcnum"40249764"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/40249764>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1999"
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/801769419>
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:genre"History."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Red-hot and righteous : the urban religion of the Salvation Army"@en
schema:numberOfPages"290"
schema:publisher
schema:reviews
rdf:typeschema:Review
schema:itemReviewed<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/40249764>
schema:reviewBody""In this engrossing study of religion, urban life, and commercial culture, Diane Winston shows how a (self-styled "red-hot") militant Protestant mission established a beachhead in the modern city. When The Salvation Army, a British evangelical movement, landed in New York in 1880, local citizens called its eye-catching advertisements "vulgar" and dubbed its brass bands, female preachers, and overheated services "sensationalist." Yet a little more than a century later this ragtag missionary movement had evolved into the nation's largest charitable fund-raiser - the very exemplar of America's most cherished values of social service and religious commitment." "Winston illustrates how the Army borrowed the forms and idioms of popular entertainments, commercial emporiums, and master marketers to deliver its message. In contrast to histories that relegate religion to the sidelines of urban society, she shows that Salvationists were at the center of debates about social services for the urban poor, the changing position of women, and the evolution of a consumer culture."--BOOK JACKET."
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.