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The reluctant surgeon : a biography of John Hunter

Author: John Kobler; New York Academy of Medicine,
Publisher: Garden City, New York : Doubleday, 1960.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : [1st ed.]View all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Since his death at the end of the eighteenth century John Hunter has been variously described by his fellow scientists as "the Shakespeare of medicine," "with the exception of Hippocrates, the grandest figure in his profession," "a philosopher whose mental grasp embraced the whole range of nature's works," "one of the greatest men the English nation has produced." Hunterian literature crowds the shelves of medical  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Kobler, John.
Reluctant surgeon.
Garden City, New York : Doubleday, 1960
(OCoLC)599159128
Online version:
Kobler, John.
Reluctant surgeon.
Garden City, New York : Doubleday, 1960
(OCoLC)607810909
Named Person: John Hunter; John Hunter; John Hunter; John Hunter
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John Kobler; New York Academy of Medicine,
OCLC Number: 456941
Description: 359 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: The hunters of Long Calderwood, 1717-1748 --
William and John, 1748-1762 --
War, 1762-1763 --
Hard times, 1763-1771 --
Jermyn Street, 1771-1783 --
The golden calf of Leicester Square, 1781-1783 --
Proteus, 1783-1793 --
Afterward.
Responsibility: John Kobler.

Abstract:

Since his death at the end of the eighteenth century John Hunter has been variously described by his fellow scientists as "the Shakespeare of medicine," "with the exception of Hippocrates, the grandest figure in his profession," "a philosopher whose mental grasp embraced the whole range of nature's works," "one of the greatest men the English nation has produced." Hunterian literature crowds the shelves of medical libraries the world over. Yet outside the scientific community the name today strikes only a dim spark of recognition, if any at all. The reason is not hard to find. Although his practical contributions were legion, none had the kind of dramatic impact, the easily grasped significance, that excites the lay imagination. What Hunter accomplished, however, transcended specific discovery and technical invention, and in its totality, was no less spectacular. He introduced a new spirit of inquiry, a philosophy, which not only transformed the medical theory and practice of his epoch, but profoundly influenced scientific thinking everywhere down to our own times. Hunter has not fared well at the hands of his biographers. This book is an effort to reclaim the scientist from the archives and the man from the shadows. -- from Preface.

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