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Rembrandt's nose : of flesh & spirit in the master's portraits

Author: Michael R Taylor; Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn
Publisher: New York : Distributed Art Publishers, ©2007.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"For nearly four hundred years, art patrons, art historians, and art lovers have studied the work of the seventeenth-century Dutch master Rembrandt van Rijn and wondered at the dramatic, almost impossible vitality of his portraits. What is it that makes them so startlingly, vividly alive across each new generation? How was it that the artist managed to paint his sitters - including himself - so that they would  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Taylor, Michael, 1966-
Rembrandt's nose.
New York : Distributed Art Publishers, c2007
(OCoLC)608038631
Named Person: Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn; Rembrandt (Harmensz van Rijn); Rembrandt, Harmensz van Rijn; Rembrandt, Harmensz van Rijn; Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Michael R Taylor; Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn
ISBN: 1933045442 9781933045443
OCLC Number: 74987961
Description: 167 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Contents: Group portrait of a man and a dog, both looking out of place --
"Without a nose, a man is no longer a man" --
A nose like the latex stock of a Hollywood makeup artist --
"This is painting, not just the pits and pores of flesh" --
An old man slumped in a wooden armchair, a widow who surrenders to no weakness --
"And their eyes were opened and they recognized him; and he vanished out of their sight" --
Like hounds closing in for a kill --
Mournful nostrils through which breath would never pass again --
Patrician beaks and an old lady's lumpish stout --
Plumb breasts, firm skin, and a profile that makes you want to cry --
The highlight on the tip of the nose --
An old man's rasping exhalations, an infant's purling breath --
Chronology.
Other Titles: Nez de Rembrandt.
Responsibility: by Michael Taylor.
More information:

Abstract:

"For nearly four hundred years, art patrons, art historians, and art lovers have studied the work of the seventeenth-century Dutch master Rembrandt van Rijn and wondered at the dramatic, almost impossible vitality of his portraits. What is it that makes them so startlingly, vividly alive across each new generation? How was it that the artist managed to paint his sitters - including himself - so that they would always appear to be breathing the very same air as ourselves? How was the flawed, brilliant, mysterious man able to convey even the most imperceptible gestures - from the slightest quiver of the lips to a momentary tremor of the nostrils - with nothing more than ground pigment, ink, or humble etching tools?" "In Rembrandt's Nose, the respected American-born, Paris based author and translator Michael Taylor endeavors to answer these enduring questions - and comes up with an astonishingly original conclusion. Chronicling Rembrandt's life and artistic evolution from his arrival in Amsterdam as a brash young artist, through his years of fame and extravagance, to the penury and grief of his final years in bankruptcy, Taylor takes us into Rembrandt's studio and right up to his easel, so that we feel we can almost touch the rich mounds of paint upon his palette and smell the fat tang of linseed oil over the pitchy salt air that drifts in through the open window. He describes precisely how our eyes take in the paintings so that we begin to see more in each image, right up to the last defining highlight on the tip of a nose. With careful, elegant, and inquisitive prose, Taylor probes the mysteries of Rembrandt's legacy and offers u an immensely pleasurable read that is as light and witty as it is illuminating."--BOOK JACKET.

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