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Remembering motivation research: toward an alternative genealogy of                interpretive consumer research
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Remembering motivation research: toward an alternative genealogy of interpretive consumer research

Author: Mark Tadajewski
Publisher: Sage Publications
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Marketing Theory, 6, no. 4 (2006): 429-466
Database:ArticleFirst
Other Databases: British Library Serials
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Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Mark Tadajewski
ISSN:1470-5931
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 437719292
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schema:description"This article traces the emergence and subsequent decline of motivation research. It argues that contrary to recent opinion that interpretive consumer research emerged in the mid-1980s, an embryonic form of interpretive research can actually be found in the 1930s in the form of motivation research. It demonstrates that there are clear and distinct parallels regarding the ontology, axiology, epistemology, methodology and view of human nature between motivation research, interpretive research and, to a limited extent, critical theory. Not only is motivation research presented as an early form of interpretive consumer research, but in addition, Holbrook's and Hirschman's experiential analysis is shown to be a possible take-off point to make the case that motivation research represents an early root of Consumer Culture Theory. This genealogical exercise resituates the emergence of the CCT discourse by 80 years and interpretive research by 60 years."
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