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The republic of labor : Philadelphia artisans and the politics of class, 1720-1830

Author: Ronald Schultz
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1993.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This innovative study of working-class formation in Philadelphia challenges a number of widely held views about the Origins and nature of the early American working class. In the prevailing interpretation, the birth of the American working class took place in the middle decades of the nineteenth century and traced its ideological roots to the republicanism of the Revolutionary and Jacksonian eras. In contrast to
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Schultz, Ronald, 1946-
Republic of labor.
New York : Oxford University Press, 1993
(OCoLC)654661042
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Ronald Schultz
ISBN: 0195075854 9780195075854
OCLC Number: 26132807
Description: xv, 298 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Contents: 1. The Anglo-American Radical Traditions of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries --
2. Property Rights and Community Rights: The Politics of Popular Revolution, 1765-1779 --
3. Reaction and Restoration: Artisan Politics in Crisis, 1780-1789 --
4. Hegemony and Counter-Hegemony: The Rebirth of Popular Radicalism, 1790-1795 --
5. An Apprenticeship to Class, 1796-1810 --
6. Confronting Industrialism: Artisan Politics and Philadelphia's Socialist Tradition, 1810-1820 --
7. Making the Republic of Labor: The Workingmen's Movement and American Working-Class Consciousness, 1820-1830.
Responsibility: Ronald Schultz.
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Abstract:

This innovative study of working-class formation in Philadelphia challenges a number of widely held views about the Origins and nature of the early American working class. In the prevailing interpretation, the birth of the American working class took place in the middle decades of the nineteenth century and traced its ideological roots to the republicanism of the Revolutionary and Jacksonian eras. In contrast to this view, Schultz argues that the origins of Philadelphia's working class lay in the dramatic social changes that transformed artisan life in eighteenth-century Philadelphia and argues as well that the city's working-class movement drew its ideological force from an indigenous small-producer tradition inherited from the artisans of early modern England. In addition, Schultz takes issue with the prevailing view that religion and party politics diminished working-class consciousness.

Rather, he details the ways in which rational religion and popular politics were an active force in the formation of Philadelphia's early working class. Engagingly written and drawing upon a wide range of sources, The Republic of Labor reconstructs the moral and political worlds of Philadelphia artisans as they created America's first working class from the crucible of economic, political, and social change in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

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