skip to content
The republic of letters : a cultural history of the French Enlightenment Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The republic of letters : a cultural history of the French Enlightenment

Author: Dena Goodman
Publisher: Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 1994.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In the first major reinterpretation of the French Enlightenment in twenty years, Dena Goodman moves beyond the traditional approach to the Enlightenment as a chapter in Western intellectual history and examines its deeper significance as cultural history. She finds the very epicenter of the Enlightenment in a community of discourse known as the Republic of Letters, where salons governed by women advanced the
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Dena Goodman
ISBN: 9780801481741 0801481740 0801429684 9780801429682
OCLC Number: 29477696
Description: xii, 338 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Introduction: A cultural history of the French Enlightenment --
The rise of the state: The Republic of Letters and the monarchy of France. The Republic of Letters in the seventeenth century ; The Encyclopédie and the project of Enlightenment ; Citizenship and the Enlightenment Republic of Letters ; --
Philosophes and salonnières: A critique of Enlightenment historiography. Rousseau's critique of salons and philosophes ; Rousseau's critique and twentieth-century historiography ; The Enlightenment salonnière --
Governing the Republic of Letters: Salonnières and the rule(s) of polite conversation ; Cultural practices of the Old Regime ; Republican governance in the salons ; Polite conversation and the Enlightenment discourse --
Into writing: Epistolary commerce in the Republic of Letters. Letters in the Enlightenment Republic of Letters ; Nouvelles à la Main and Correspondances littéraires ; Periodicals ; Public subscription --
Into print: Discord in the Republic of Letters. Galiani's Dialogues sur le commerce des blés ; The physiocrats fight back ; Morellet's Réfutation ; Diderot's Apologie --
Masculine self-governance and the end of salon culture. The apotheosis of public opinion --
Pahin de la Blancherie: General agent of the Republic of Letters ; Masonic sociability ; The Musée de Monsieur ; Increased competition and the struggle for survival --
Conclusion: The Enlightenment of Letters and the French Revolution. Brissot's Lycée de Londres ; The Cercle Social and the Jacobin Club ; A reevaluation of Tocqueville.
Responsibility: Dena Goodman.

Abstract:

In the first major reinterpretation of the French Enlightenment in twenty years, Dena Goodman moves beyond the traditional approach to the Enlightenment as a chapter in Western intellectual history and examines its deeper significance as cultural history. She finds the very epicenter of the Enlightenment in a community of discourse known as the Republic of Letters, where salons governed by women advanced the Enlightenment project "to change the common way of thinking.".

Goodman details the history of the Republic of Letters in the Parisian salons, where men and women, philosophes and salonnieres, together not only introduced reciprocity into intellectual life through the practices of letter writing and polite conversation but also developed a republican model of government that was to challenge the monarchy.

Providing a new understanding of women's importance in the Enlightenment, Goodman demonstrates that in the Republic of Letters men and women played complementary - and unequal - roles. Salonnieres governed the Republic of Letters by enforcing rules of polite conversation that made possible a discourse characterized by liberty and civility.

.

Goodman chronicles the story of the Republic of Letters from its earliest formation through major periods of change: the production of the Encyclopedia, the proliferation of a print culture that widened circles of readership beyond the control of salon governance, and the early years of the French Revolution.

Although the legacy of the Republic of Letters remained a force in French cultural and political life, in the 1780s men formed new intellectual institutions that asserted their ability to govern themselves and that marginalized women. The Republic of Letters introduces provocative explanations both for the failure of the Enlightenment and for the role of the Enlightenment in the French Revolution.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/29477696>
library:oclcnum"29477696"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/29477696>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/862898>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Verlichting (cultuurgeschiedenis)"@en
schema:name"Civilization"@en
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/934829>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Salons (cultuurgeschiedenis)"@en
schema:name"French prose literature"@en
schema:about
<http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh85051908>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"French prose literature--18th century--History and criticism."@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1994"
schema:description"In the first major reinterpretation of the French Enlightenment in twenty years, Dena Goodman moves beyond the traditional approach to the Enlightenment as a chapter in Western intellectual history and examines its deeper significance as cultural history. She finds the very epicenter of the Enlightenment in a community of discourse known as the Republic of Letters, where salons governed by women advanced the Enlightenment project "to change the common way of thinking."."@en
schema:description"Introduction: A cultural history of the French Enlightenment -- The rise of the state: The Republic of Letters and the monarchy of France. The Republic of Letters in the seventeenth century ; The Encyclopédie and the project of Enlightenment ; Citizenship and the Enlightenment Republic of Letters ; -- Philosophes and salonnières: A critique of Enlightenment historiography. Rousseau's critique of salons and philosophes ; Rousseau's critique and twentieth-century historiography ; The Enlightenment salonnière -- Governing the Republic of Letters: Salonnières and the rule(s) of polite conversation ; Cultural practices of the Old Regime ; Republican governance in the salons ; Polite conversation and the Enlightenment discourse -- Into writing: Epistolary commerce in the Republic of Letters. Letters in the Enlightenment Republic of Letters ; Nouvelles à la Main and Correspondances littéraires ; Periodicals ; Public subscription -- Into print: Discord in the Republic of Letters. Galiani's Dialogues sur le commerce des blés ; The physiocrats fight back ; Morellet's Réfutation ; Diderot's Apologie -- Masculine self-governance and the end of salon culture. The apotheosis of public opinion -- Pahin de la Blancherie: General agent of the Republic of Letters ; Masonic sociability ; The Musée de Monsieur ; Increased competition and the struggle for survival -- Conclusion: The Enlightenment of Letters and the French Revolution. Brissot's Lycée de Londres ; The Cercle Social and the Jacobin Club ; A reevaluation of Tocqueville."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/20719701>
schema:genre"Criticism, interpretation, etc."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The republic of letters : a cultural history of the French Enlightenment"@en
schema:numberOfPages"338"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.