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Rereading the Harlem renaissance : race, class, and gender in the fiction of Jessie Fauset, Zora Neale Hurston, and Dorothy West

Author: Sharon L Jones
Publisher: Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2002.
Series: Contributions in Afro-American and African studies, no. 207.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"This rereading of the Harlem Renaissance gives special attention to Fauset, Hurston, and West. Jones argues that all three aesthetics influence each of their works, that they have been historically mislabeled, and that they share a drive to challenge racial, class, and gender oppression. The introduction provides a detailed historical overview of the Harlem Renaissance and the prevailing aesthetics of the period.  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Jones, Sharon L. (Sharon Lynette)
Rereading the Harlem renaissance.
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2002
(OCoLC)605986045
Online version:
Jones, Sharon L. (Sharon Lynette)
Rereading the Harlem renaissance.
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2002
(OCoLC)608357277
Named Person: Dorothy West; Jessie Redmon Fauset; Zora Neale Hurston; Dorothy West; Jessie Redmon Fauset; Dorothy West; Jessie Redmon Fauset; Zora Neale Hurston; Zora Neale Hurston; Dorothy West; Jessie Redmon Fauset; Jessie Redmon Fauset; Zora Neale Hurston; Dorothy West
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Sharon L Jones
ISBN: 0313323267 9780313323263
OCLC Number: 49625071
Description: 159 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Deconstructing the Black Bourgeoisie: subversions and diversions in the fiction of Jesssie Fauset --
"How it feels to be colored me": social protest in the fiction of Zora Neale Hurston --
A closet revolutionary: the politics of representation in the fiction of Dorothy West.
Series Title: Contributions in Afro-American and African studies, no. 207.
Responsibility: Sharon L. Jones.
More information:

Abstract:

"This rereading of the Harlem Renaissance gives special attention to Fauset, Hurston, and West. Jones argues that all three aesthetics influence each of their works, that they have been historically mislabeled, and that they share a drive to challenge racial, class, and gender oppression. The introduction provides a detailed historical overview of the Harlem Renaissance and the prevailing aesthetics of the period. Individual chapters analyze the works of Hurston, West, and Fauset to demonstrate how the folk, bourgeois, and proletarian aesthetics figure into their writings. The volume concludes by discussing the writers in relation to contemporary African American women authors."--Jacket.

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