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Resolving ecosystem complexity

Author: Oswald J Schmitz
Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, ©2010.
Series: Monographs in population biology, 47.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Schmitz begins with the universal concept that ecosystems are comprised of species that consume resources and which are then resources for other consumers. From this, he deduces a fundamental rule or evolutionary ecological mechanism for explaining context dependency: individuals within a species trade off foraging gains against the risk of being consumed by predators. Through empirical examples, Schmitz illustrates  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Schmitz, Oswald J.
Resolving ecosystem complexity.
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2010
(OCoLC)743493160
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Oswald J Schmitz
ISBN: 9780691128481 0691128480 9780691128498 0691128499
OCLC Number: 495547190
Awards: Commended for Choice Magazine Outstanding Reference/Academic Book Award 2011.
Description: xvi, 173 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: 1. Introduction --
Philosophical musings --
Explaining contingency: a worldview --
Contingency and emergence --
Preparing the mind for discovery --
Structure of the book --
2. Conceptualizing ecosystem structure --
Abstracting complexity --
Whole system vs. building blocks approach --
Defining species interaction modules --
Identifying interaction modules in a grassland ecosystem --
Conception of ecosystem structure --
3. Trophic dynamics: why is the world green? --
Trophic control as an emergent property of resource limitation --
Explaining contingency in trophic control of ecosystem function --
The nature of resource limitation and trophic control of food chains --
The mechanism switching hypothesis of trophic control --
Effects of herbivore feeding mode --
Collective effects of herbivore species with different feeding modes --
Plant-antiherbivore defense and strength of trophic control --
Herbivore resource selection and ecosystem function --
Stoichiometry and herbivore resource use --
Resource selection and ecosystem function --
Herbivore indirect effects and engineering of green worlds --
Herbivore-mediated carnivore indirect effects on ecosystems --
Carnivore indirect effects on plant diversity --
Carnivore indirect effects on ecosystem function --
4. The green world and the brown chain --
Conceptualizing functions along detritus-based chains --
Resource limitation and trophic control --
Trophic control of decomposition --
Trophic control of mineralization --
Mechanisms of top-down control --
Trophic coupling between detritus-based and plant-based chains --
5. The evolutionary ecology of trophic control in ecosystems --
Carnivore species and the nature of trophic interactions in an old-field system --
Carnivore hunting mode and the nature of trophic interactions --
The evolutionary ecology of trophic cascades --
6. The whole and the parts --
Developing predictive theory for emergence --
Contingency and carnivore diversity effects on ecosystems --
Carnivore diversity and emergent effects on ecosystem function --
Shifting down one trophic level: intermediate species diversity and ecosystem function --
Herbivore diversity and mediation of top-down control of ecosystem function --
Detritivore diversity and mediation of top-down control of ecosystem function --
The basal trophic level: plant diversity and ecosystem function --
Functional classifications --
Resource identity effects on trophic interactions --
Moving forward on functional diversity and ecosystem function --
7. The ecological theater and the evolutionary ecological play --
Phenotypic variation and state-dependent trade-offs --
Attacked plants attract predators --
Predators that avoid predation --
The nonconsumptive basis of trophic transfer efficiencies --
Trophic interactions in a changing theater --
Rapid change in hunting strategy --
Landscapes of fear and ecosystem management.
Series Title: Monographs in population biology, 47.
Responsibility: Oswald J. Schmitz.

Abstract:

How should an ecosystem be conceptualized to blend its biotic and biophysical components? How should evolutionary ecological principles be used to derive an operational understanding of complex,  Read more...

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One of Choice's Outstanding Academic Titles for 2011 "Within the fast-growing landscape of ecological literature, this book emerges as a rare yet inspiring attempt to explain ecosystem complexity. Read more...

 
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