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Respected sir

Author: Najīb Maḥfūẓ
Publisher: New York : Doubleday, 1990.
Edition/Format:   Book : Fiction : English : 1st Anchor Books edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
With this portrait of a misanthropic civil servant, the Egyptian Nobel laureate devises a cunning send-up of egregious ambition, stodgy bureaucracy and cloying piety. Mahfouz's overblown language mirrors the grandiose aspirations of his protagonist Othman Bayyumi, a common archives clerk who schemes for a lofty appointment as Director General, expounding that "a government position is a brick in the edifice of the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Fiction
Fiction Translations into English
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Maḥfūẓ, Najīb, 1911-2006.
Respected sir.
New York : Doubleday, 1990
(OCoLC)648369406
Material Type: Fiction
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Najīb Maḥfūẓ
ISBN: 0385264798 9780385264792
OCLC Number: 20694186
Language Note: Translation of: Ḥaḍrat al-muḥtaram.
Description: 200 pages ; 21 cm
Other Titles: Ḥaḍrat al-muḥtaram.
Responsibility: Naguib Mahfouz ; translated by Rasheed El-Enany.
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Abstract:

With this portrait of a misanthropic civil servant, the Egyptian Nobel laureate devises a cunning send-up of egregious ambition, stodgy bureaucracy and cloying piety. Mahfouz's overblown language mirrors the grandiose aspirations of his protagonist Othman Bayyumi, a common archives clerk who schemes for a lofty appointment as Director General, expounding that "a government position is a brick in the edifice of the state, and the state is an exhalation of the spirit of God, incarnate on earth." As Egypt experiences the birth pangs of nationalism, Othman remains an apolitical, selfish loner wallowing in his self-imposed misery, who fawns over his superiors, works like a dervish and squirrels away his money, his only physical pleasures the visits he pays religiously to a prostitute, which "were usually followed by a wholehearted plea for forgiveness and a prolonged resort to prayer and worship."45 Envisioning marriage as a means to forge social connections that will launch him to glory, he viciously turns down prospective brides; because no one is good enough for him, he ends up in his later years with two wives, one a opium-addict aging prostitute, the other a young woman who uses him as he sought to use others. -- from http://www.amazon.ca (April 26, 2011).

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