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The restoration of Rome : barbarian popes and imperial pretenders

Author: P J Heather
Publisher: London ; New York : Oxford University Press, USA, 2014.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In 476 AD, the last of Rome's emperors, known as "Augustulus" was deposed by a barbarian general, the son of one of Attila the Hun's henchmen. With the imperial vestments dispatched to Constantinople, the curtain fell on the Roman empire in Western Europe, its territories divided among successor kingdoms constructed around barbarian military manpower. But, if the Roman Empire was dead, Romans across the old empire  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Named Person: Theodoric, King of the Ostrogoths; Justinian, Emperor of the East; Charlemagne, Emperor; Charlemagne, Emperor; Justinian, Emperor of the East; Theodoric, King of the Ostrogoths; Iustinianus, Imperium Byzantinum Imperator; Karl, Heiliges Römisches Reich Kaiser; Theoderich, Ostgotenreich König
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: P J Heather
ISBN: 9780199368518 0199368511
OCLC Number: 859384184
Description: xviii, 470 pages : illustrations (some color), maps ; 25 cm
Contents: 'A copy of the only empire.' Gens purpura ; A philosopher in purple --
'The conquerer of many nations.' 'By the authority of God' ; Sailing to Byzantium --
The Father of Europe. Christmas Day, 800 ; 'The centre cannot hold' --
Second Coming. Charles the Great and Leo the Pope ; Habemus papam : papal lift-off --
The godfather (part 3).
Responsibility: Peter Heather.

Abstract:

"In 476 AD, the last of Rome's emperors, known as "Augustulus" was deposed by a barbarian general, the son of one of Attila the Hun's henchmen. With the imperial vestments dispatched to Constantinople, the curtain fell on the Roman empire in Western Europe, its territories divided among successor kingdoms constructed around barbarian military manpower. But, if the Roman Empire was dead, Romans across the old empire still lived, holding on to their lands, the values of their civilization, and their institutions. The conquering barbarians, witnessing the continuing psychological dominance of Rome, were ready to reignite the imperial flame and enjoy the benefits of its civilization. As Peter Heather shows in dazzling biographical portraits, each of the three greatest contenders--Theoderic, Justinian, and Charlemagne--operated with a different power base but was astonishingly successful in his own way. Though each in turn managed to put back together enough of the old Roman West to stake a plausible claim to the Western imperial title, none of their empires long outlived their founders' deaths. Not until the reinvention of the papacy in the eleventh century would Europe's barbarians find the means to establish a new Roman Empire, one that has lasted a thousand years"--

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Linked Data


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