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Revision and romantic authorship

Author: Zachary Leader
Publisher: Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press. 1996.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The Romantic author as spontaneous, extemporizing, otherworldly and autonomous is a fiction much in need of revision. Zachary Leader argues that the continuing influence of a Romantic preference for what comes naturally, with a concomitant devaluing of secondary processes, distorts our understanding of the actual creative practices of writers of the period, even those most closely associated with Romantic
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Leader, Zachary.
Revision and romantic authorship.
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press. 1996
(OCoLC)646209157
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Zachary Leader
ISBN: 0198122640 9780198122647
OCLC Number: 33862093
Description: ix, 354 p. ; 23 cm.
Contents: Revision and personal identity --
Wordsworth, revision, and personal identity --
Byron, revision, and the stable self --
Coleridge's revisionary complexity --
Revision and authorial autonomy --
Parenting Frankenstein --
John Taylor and the poems of Clare --
Keats, the critics, and the public.
Responsibility: Zachary Leader.
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Abstract:

The Romantic author as spontaneous, extemporizing, otherworldly and autonomous is a fiction much in need of revision. Zachary Leader argues that the continuing influence of a Romantic preference for what comes naturally, with a concomitant devaluing of secondary processes, distorts our understanding of the actual creative practices of writers of the period, even those most closely associated with Romantic assumptions. 'Second thoughts' (including those of collaborators) play a crucial role in the writings of Wordsworth, Byron, Coleridge, Mary Shelley, Clare, and Keats.

Other assumptions complicated by a study of the actual revising practices of Romantic writers are those which associate composition with the organic and with process, or which characterize authors as independent agents or figures of coherent and consistent subjectivity. In the first part of the book, Leader shows how revisionary and editorial habits (those not only of the writers themselves but of their modern editors) reflect conflicting attitudes to the self or personal identity; in the second, these attitudes are related to the role of "collaborators" in the revising process, including family, friends, publishers, critics, and readers.

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