skip to content
The rise and (partial) fall of abstract painting in the twentieth century Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The rise and (partial) fall of abstract painting in the twentieth century

Author: David W Galenson; National Bureau of Economic Research.
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : National Bureau of Economic Research, 2008.
Series: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. 13744.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Non-representational painting was one of the most radical artistic innovations of the twentieth century. Abstract painting was created independently by three great pioneers - the experimental innovators Kandinsky and Mondrian, and the conceptual Malevich - virtually simultaneously, in the years immediately before and after the outbreak of World War I. It became the dominant form of advanced art in the decade after  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy online

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: David W Galenson; National Bureau of Economic Research.
OCLC Number: 191089508
Notes: "January 2008."
Description: 1 online resource (37, [6] pages).
Series Title: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. 13744.
Responsibility: David Galenson.

Abstract:

Non-representational painting was one of the most radical artistic innovations of the twentieth century. Abstract painting was created independently by three great pioneers - the experimental innovators Kandinsky and Mondrian, and the conceptual Malevich - virtually simultaneously, in the years immediately before and after the outbreak of World War I. It became the dominant form of advanced art in the decade after the end of World War II, as Pollock, de Kooning, Rothko, and their colleagues developed the experimental forms of Abstract Expressionism. But in the late 1950s and early ₁60s, Johns, Rauschenberg, Warhol, and a host of other young artists abruptly made a conceptual revolution in advanced art, and in the process reduced abstract painting to a minor role. The pioneers of abstract painting and the Abstract Expressionists had all been committed to abstraction as a vehicle for artistic discovery, and had believed that it would dominate the art of the future, but since the 1960s abstraction has become at most a part-time style for leading painters, and it is often used to mock the seriousness of earlier abstract painters.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/191089508> # The rise and (partial) fall of abstract painting in the twentieth century
    a schema:MediaObject, schema:CreativeWork, schema:Book ;
   library:oclcnum "191089508" ;
   library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/mau> ;
   library:placeOfPublication <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/119487241#Place/cambridge_mass> ; # Cambridge, Mass.
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/119487241#Event/1900_1999> ; # 1900-1999
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/119487241#Topic/painting_abstract_history_20th_century> ; # Painting, Abstract--History--20th century
   schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1050640> ; # Painting, Abstract
   schema:bookFormat schema:EBook ;
   schema:contributor <http://viaf.org/viaf/135446122> ; # National Bureau of Economic Research.
   schema:creator <http://viaf.org/viaf/265377968> ; # David W. Galenson
   schema:datePublished "2008" ;
   schema:description "Non-representational painting was one of the most radical artistic innovations of the twentieth century. Abstract painting was created independently by three great pioneers - the experimental innovators Kandinsky and Mondrian, and the conceptual Malevich - virtually simultaneously, in the years immediately before and after the outbreak of World War I. It became the dominant form of advanced art in the decade after the end of World War II, as Pollock, de Kooning, Rothko, and their colleagues developed the experimental forms of Abstract Expressionism. But in the late 1950s and early ₁60s, Johns, Rauschenberg, Warhol, and a host of other young artists abruptly made a conceptual revolution in advanced art, and in the process reduced abstract painting to a minor role. The pioneers of abstract painting and the Abstract Expressionists had all been committed to abstraction as a vehicle for artistic discovery, and had believed that it would dominate the art of the future, but since the 1960s abstraction has become at most a part-time style for leading painters, and it is often used to mock the seriousness of earlier abstract painters."@en ;
   schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/119487241> ;
   schema:genre "History"@en ;
   schema:inLanguage "en" ;
   schema:isPartOf <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/119487241#Series/nber_working_paper_series> ; # NBER working paper series ;
   schema:isPartOf <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/119487241#Series/working_paper_series_national_bureau_of_economic_research> ; # Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) ;
   schema:name "The rise and (partial) fall of abstract painting in the twentieth century"@en ;
   schema:productID "191089508" ;
   schema:publication <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/191089508#PublicationEvent/cambridge_mass_national_bureau_of_economic_research_2008> ;
   schema:publisher <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/119487241#Agent/national_bureau_of_economic_research> ; # National Bureau of Economic Research
   schema:url <http://papers.nber.org/papers/w13744> ;
   wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/191089508> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/119487241#Agent/national_bureau_of_economic_research> # National Bureau of Economic Research
    a bgn:Agent ;
   schema:name "National Bureau of Economic Research" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/119487241#Place/cambridge_mass> # Cambridge, Mass.
    a schema:Place ;
   schema:name "Cambridge, Mass." ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/119487241#Series/nber_working_paper_series> # NBER working paper series ;
    a bgn:PublicationSeries ;
   schema:hasPart <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/191089508> ; # The rise and (partial) fall of abstract painting in the twentieth century
   schema:name "NBER working paper series ;" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/119487241#Series/working_paper_series_national_bureau_of_economic_research> # Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) ;
    a bgn:PublicationSeries ;
   schema:hasPart <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/191089508> ; # The rise and (partial) fall of abstract painting in the twentieth century
   schema:name "Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) ;" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/119487241#Topic/painting_abstract_history_20th_century> # Painting, Abstract--History--20th century
    a schema:Intangible ;
   schema:hasPart <http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh85096683> ;
   schema:name "Painting, Abstract--History--20th century"@en ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1050640> # Painting, Abstract
    a schema:Intangible ;
   schema:name "Painting, Abstract"@en ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/135446122> # National Bureau of Economic Research.
    a schema:Organization ;
   schema:name "National Bureau of Economic Research." ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/265377968> # David W. Galenson
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:familyName "Galenson" ;
   schema:givenName "David W." ;
   schema:name "David W. Galenson" ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.