skip to content
Rock Hudson's home movies : Pillow talk. Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Rock Hudson's home movies : Pillow talk.

Author: Doris DayRock HudsonTony RandallMark RappaportMichael GordonAll authors
Publisher: [1999?]
Series: Gay cinema study package.
Edition/Format:   VHS video : PAL color broadcast system : VHS tape   Visual material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
One of the best example of 1950s sex comedies that manages to be also utterly sexist, 'Pillow Talk' was the first of many Doris Day-Rock Hudson pairing. The premise is fairly simple: take two hopelessely mismatched people and make them fall in love. Jan Morrow, pert and wholesome interior decorator and Brad Allen, a notorious songwriter and playboy have shared a party line for long enough to know they dislike each
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Biography
Named Person: Rock Hudson
Material Type: Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Doris Day; Rock Hudson; Tony Randall; Mark Rappaport; Michael Gordon; Eric Farr
OCLC Number: 222907507
Notes: Rock Hudson's home movies first released as a motion picture: United States : Couch Potato Productions, 1992 ; Pillow talk first released as a motion picture: United States : Arwin Productions, 1959.
Colour recording system: PAL.
Credits: Pillow talk: producers, Russ Hunter, Martin Melcher ; director, Michael Gordon ; writers, Stanley Shapiro, Maurice Richlin ; photography, Arthur E. Arling ; music, Frank de Vol. Rock Hudson's home movies: director, Mark Rappaport ; photography, Mark Daniels.
Cast: Pillow talk: Rock Hudson, Doris Day, Tony Randall, Thelma Ritter ; Rock Hudson's home movies: Rock Hudson, Eric Farr.
Description: 2 videocassettes (VHS) (162 min.) : sd., col. with b&w sequences ; 1/2 in.
Series Title: Gay cinema study package.
Other Titles: Pillow talk

Abstract:

One of the best example of 1950s sex comedies that manages to be also utterly sexist, 'Pillow Talk' was the first of many Doris Day-Rock Hudson pairing. The premise is fairly simple: take two hopelessely mismatched people and make them fall in love. Jan Morrow, pert and wholesome interior decorator and Brad Allen, a notorious songwriter and playboy have shared a party line for long enough to know they dislike each other intensely. But when Brad eventually sees Jan in person he falls in love. In order to win her over, Brad has to go to extraordinary lengths (posing as a wealthy but naive Texan) to conceal that he is also the voice at the other end of the phone line that has been making Jan's life a misery. Mark Rappaport revealed the gay-baiting innuendo of 'Pillow Talk' in his film 'Rock Hudson's Home Movies'. 'Pillow Talk' was the second-largest grossing film of the fifties, surpassed only by 'The Glenn Miller Story'

Rock Hudson's home movie: This film-clip biography dissects the life and career of Rock Hudson in the light of his now uncovered homosexuality. Mark Rappaport's film is not just another hagiography of a 'gay icon'. Rather, through Rock and his screen persona, Rappaport uncovers the shifting values that have presided over the representation of sexual politics and masculinity over the last 40 years in mainstream media. Trapped in his big man image, Rock appears as the constant butt of gay-baiting jokes not so subtlely scattered throughout his films by producers and screenwriters.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/222907507>
library:oclcnum"222907507"
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/222907507>
rdf:typeschema:Movie
rdf:typej.1:VHS
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:datePublished"1999"
schema:datePublished""
schema:description"One of the best example of 1950s sex comedies that manages to be also utterly sexist, 'Pillow Talk' was the first of many Doris Day-Rock Hudson pairing. The premise is fairly simple: take two hopelessely mismatched people and make them fall in love. Jan Morrow, pert and wholesome interior decorator and Brad Allen, a notorious songwriter and playboy have shared a party line for long enough to know they dislike each other intensely. But when Brad eventually sees Jan in person he falls in love. In order to win her over, Brad has to go to extraordinary lengths (posing as a wealthy but naive Texan) to conceal that he is also the voice at the other end of the phone line that has been making Jan's life a misery. Mark Rappaport revealed the gay-baiting innuendo of 'Pillow Talk' in his film 'Rock Hudson's Home Movies'. 'Pillow Talk' was the second-largest grossing film of the fifties, surpassed only by 'The Glenn Miller Story'"@en
schema:description"Rock Hudson's home movie: This film-clip biography dissects the life and career of Rock Hudson in the light of his now uncovered homosexuality. Mark Rappaport's film is not just another hagiography of a 'gay icon'. Rather, through Rock and his screen persona, Rappaport uncovers the shifting values that have presided over the representation of sexual politics and masculinity over the last 40 years in mainstream media. Trapped in his big man image, Rock appears as the constant butt of gay-baiting jokes not so subtlely scattered throughout his films by producers and screenwriters."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1807478700>
schema:genre"Biography"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Pillow talk"@en
schema:name"Rock Hudson's home movies Pillow talk."@en
schema:url

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.