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Roosevelt's warrior : Harold L. Ickes and the New Deal

Author: Jeanne Nienaber Clarke
Publisher: Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, ©1996.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
By any measure, Harold Ickes was one of the towering figures of the New Deal. With remarkable energy and a genius for organization, he transformed a tradition-bound, much-maligned Department of the Interior into a progressive and highly respected organization. He was known for his sharp wit and brilliant intellect. He could be crusty, temperamental, and self-righteous. And he was just the kind of tenacious fighter  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Clarke, Jeanne Nienaber, 1943-
Roosevelt's warrior.
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, c1996
(OCoLC)605023577
Online version:
Clarke, Jeanne Nienaber, 1943-
Roosevelt's warrior.
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, c1996
(OCoLC)606000615
Named Person: Harold L Ickes; Harold Ickes; Harold L Ickes
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Jeanne Nienaber Clarke
ISBN: 0801850940 9780801850943
OCLC Number: 33276680
Description: xvii, 414 p., [12] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: 1. The Great Transformation: From Altoona to the Nation's Capital --
2. "Is Mr. Ickes Here?": The Appointment --
3. "Form Your Ranks and Fight!": The 100 Days --
4. "To Rival Cheops": The New Public Works Administrator --
5. Over a Barrel: Ickes's Oil Administration --
6. The Juggler: Interior, Oil, and Public Works --
7. "A Dash for the Timber": Agriculture and Conservation --
8. "I Am Not a Boondoggler": In the Ring with Harry Hopkins --
9. "Back to Work": Planning, Politics, and the PWA --
10. "I Struck a Real Note": The Liberal Lightning Rod --
11. The New Deal Triumphant: The 1936 Election --
12. "A First Class Fight on His Hands": Court Attacks and Heart Attacks --
13. "Facing the Common Enemy": Circling the Wagons --
14. "Nations in Nightshirts": Recession and Racism --
15. The Calm after the Storm: Departmental Woes and a Dublin Wedding --
16. "To Sail, Not Drift": The Challenge of 1938 --
17. Battle for the Big Trees: Forests versus Parks --
18. His Finest Hour: In Defense of Civil Liberties and Rights --
19. Ickes's Book of Revelations: The Personal Memoirs --
20. "Then It's Happened": War in Europe --
21. The Secretary and the Sun President.
Responsibility: Jeanne Nienaber Clarke.
More information:

Abstract:

By any measure, Harold Ickes was one of the towering figures of the New Deal. With remarkable energy and a genius for organization, he transformed a tradition-bound, much-maligned Department of the Interior into a progressive and highly respected organization. He was known for his sharp wit and brilliant intellect. He could be crusty, temperamental, and self-righteous. And he was just the kind of tenacious fighter FDR needed. In this political biography of the nation's most influential secretary of the interior, Jeanne Clarke examines Harold Ickes's tenure in the Roosevelt administration and his role as a powerful champion of New Deal policies. She offers an unprecedented examination of the internal conflicts that raged within Roosevelt's bureaucracy and provides new insights into the public career and private life of FDR's "liberal lightning rod." Ickes led the Interior Department for all of Roosevelt's thirteen years in the White House, a tenure longer than any Interior secretary before or since. Soon after his appointment as secretary in 1933, Ickes took on the added duties and political clout of public works administrator and oil administrator. As a popular public speaker, he was an important player in FDR's reelection campaigns. He often deflected criticism and attention away from the president by assuming the role of the administration's "hatchet man." In a variety of ways, Clarke concludes, Ickes helped to define the role of the modern political executive. Roosevelt's Warrior is also a revealing look at FDR himself. Clarke describes the president as a figure so genuinely attractive that he managed to keep even self-styled curmudgeons like Ickes orbiting around him. To this day, Clarke notes, FDR has the capacity to attract our attention and influence our political life. This study of his close friend and political partner Harold Ickes helps to explain why.--Publisher description.

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Linked Data


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