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Rosalind Franklin : the dark lady of DNA

Author: Brenda Maddox
Publisher: New York : HarperCollins, 2002.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In March 1953, Maurice Wilkins of King's College, London, announced the departure of his obstructive colleague Rosalind Franklin to rival Cavendish Laboratory scientist Francis Crick. But it was too late. Franklin's unpublished data and crucial photograph of DNA had already been seen by her competitors at the Cambridge University lab. With the aid of these, plus their own knowledge, Watson and Crick discovered the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
History
Named Person: Rosalind Franklin; Rosalind Franklin
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Brenda Maddox
ISBN: 0060184078 9780060184070
OCLC Number: 50089841
Description: xix, 380 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., ports. ; 23 cm.
Contents: Once in Royal David's City --
'Alarmingly clever' --
Once a Paulina --
Never surrender --
Holes in coal --
Woman of the Left Bank --
Seine v. Strand --
What is life? --
Joining the circus --
Such a funny lab --
Undeclared race --
Eureka and goodbye --
Escaping notice --
Acid next door --
O my America --
New friends, new enemies --
Postponed departure --
Private health, public health --
Clarity and perfection --
Epilogue; life after death.
Responsibility: Brenda Maddox.
More information:

Abstract:

In March 1953, Maurice Wilkins of King's College, London, announced the departure of his obstructive colleague Rosalind Franklin to rival Cavendish Laboratory scientist Francis Crick. But it was too late. Franklin's unpublished data and crucial photograph of DNA had already been seen by her competitors at the Cambridge University lab. With the aid of these, plus their own knowledge, Watson and Crick discovered the structure of the molecule that genes are composed of--DNA, the secret of life. This is a powerful story of a remarkable simpleminded, forthright and tempestuous young woman who, at the age of fifteen, decided she was going to be a scientist, but who was airbrushed out of the greatest scientific discovery of the twentieth century.

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Rosalind Franklin: the dark lady of DNA.

by wppalmer (WorldCat user published 2013-01-13) Excellent Permalink

Review of Rosalind Franklin: the dark lady of DNA by Brenda Maddox.

CITATION: Maddox, Brenda (2002). Rosalind Franklin: the dark lady of DNA. New York: HarperCollins (Perennial).

Reviewer: Dr W. P. Palmer.

This was a book which I enjoyed reading which has been on my...
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