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The Rosenwald Schools of the American South

Autore: Mary S Hoffschwelle
Editore: Gainesville, FL : University Press of Florida, ©2006.
Serie: New perspectives on the history of the South.
Edizione/Formato:   book_printbook : State or province government publication : EnglishVedi tutte le edizioni e i formati
Banca dati:WorldCat
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"Mary S. Hoffschwelle tells the story of a remarkable partnership to build model schools for black children during the Jim Crow era in the South. The Rosenwald program, which erected more than 5,300 schools and auxiliary buildings between 1912 and 1932, began with Booker T. Washington, then principal of Tuskegee Institute, who turned for financing to Julius Rosenwald, president of Sears, Roebuck & Company. By
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Genere/forma: History
Tipo materiale: Government publication, State or province government publication, Risorsa internet
Tipo documento: Book, Internet Resource
Tutti gli autori / Collaboratori: Mary S Hoffschwelle
ISBN: 0813029570 9780813029573
Numero OCLC: 62741561
Descrizione: xx, 401 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
Contenuti: pt. 1. The Rosenwald school-building program --
pt. 2. Rosenwald schools and public education in southern states --
pt. 3. Rosenwald schools in African American communities.
Titolo della serie: New perspectives on the history of the South.
Responsabilità: Mary S. Hoffschwelle ; foreword by John David Smith.
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Abstract:

Tells the story of a remarkable partnership to build model schools for black children during the Jim Crow era in the South. This story about the Rosenwald program - a tale of extraordinary generosity  Per saperne di più…

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"What a story! African American grassroots activists hungry for education generous gift from the Jewish CEO of mass-merchant Sears & Roebuck, public-private partnerships forged with white officials Per saperne di più…

 
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schema:description""Though the program's funding ended with Rosenwald's death in 1932, many continued as public institutions. The National Trust for Historic Preservation named Rosenwald Schools to its list of America's Most Endangered Historic Places in 2002. Hoffschwelle examines these buildings as exemplars for school architecture and design, as community institutions and partnerships, and as a means of formalizing a state education program that, finally, would include black children. This story of extraordinary generosity and sacrifice will interest scholars of American and African-American history, educators, school planners, and preservationists."--BOOK JACKET."@en
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schema:description""The Rosenwald schools, scores of which still stand, exemplified the ideal educational environment - designed for efficiency, making full use of natural light to protect children's eyesight, and providing sufficient space for learning. Ironically, these schools, which represented the social centers of their African American communities, also helped to set standards for white schools."."@en
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