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Rousseau

Author: John Morley
Publisher: London : Chapman and Hall ; New York : D. Appleton and Co., 1873.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Morley, John, 1838-1923.
Rousseau.
London : Chapman and Hall ; New York : D. Appleton and co., 1873
(OCoLC)555525651
Online version:
Morley, John, 1838-1923.
Rousseau.
London : Chapman and Hall ; New York : D. Appleton and co., 1873
(OCoLC)608482726
Named Person: Jean-Jacques Rousseau; Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John Morley
OCLC Number: 20681145
Description: 2 volumes ; 22 cm
Contents: Vol 1 : I. Preliminary : the revolution ; Rousseau its most direct speculative precursor ; his distinction among revolutionists ; his personality --
II. Youth : birth and descent ; predispositions ; first lessons ; at M. Lambercier's ; early disclosure of sensitive termperament ; return to Geneva ; two apprenticeships ; flight from Geneva ; Savoyard proselytizers ; Rousseau sent to Annecy, and thence to Turin ; conversion to Catholicism ; takes service with madame de Vercellis ; then with the count de Gouvon ; returns to vagabondage ; and to madame de Warens --
III. Savoy : influence of women upon Rousseau ; account of madame de Warens ; Rousseau takes up his abode with her ; his delight in life with her ; the seminarists ; to Lyons ; wanderings to Freiburg, Neuchatel, and elsewhere ; through the east of France ; influence of these wanderings upon him ; Chamberi ; household of madame de Warens ; Les Charmettes ; account of his feeling for nature ; his intellectual incapacity at this time ; temperament ; literary interests, and method ; joyful days with his benefactress ; to Montpellier: end of an episode ; dates IV. Theresa Le Vasseur : tutorship at Lyons ; goes to Paris in search of fortune ; his appearance at this time ; made secretary to the ambassador at Venice ; his journey thither and life there ; return to Paris ; Theresa Le Vasseur ; character of their union ; Rousseau's conduct towards her ; their later estrangements ; Rousseau's scanty means ; puts away his five children ; his apologies for the crime ; their futility ; attempts to recover the children ; Rousseau never married to Theresa ; contrast between outer and inner life --
V. The discourses : local academies in France ; circumstances of the composition of the first discourse ; how far the paradox was original ; his visions for thirteen years ; summary of the first discourse ; obligations to Montaigne ; and to the Greeks ; semi-Socratic manner ; objections to the discourse ; ways of stating its positive side ; dangers of exaggerating this positive side ; its excess second discourse ; ideas of the time upon the state of nature ; their influence upon Rousseau ; Morelly, as his predecessor ; summary of the second discourse ; criticism on its method ; objection from its want of evidence ; other objections to its account of primitive nature ; takes uniformity of process for granted ; in what the importance of the second discourse consisted ; its protest against the mockery of civilization ; the equality of man, how true, and how false ; this doctrine in France, and in America ; Rousseau's discourses, a reaction against the historic method ; Mably, and socialism VI. Paris : Influence of Geneva upon Rousseau ; two sides of his temperament ; uncongenial characteristics of Parisian society ; his associates ; circumstances of a sudden moral reform ; arising from his violent repugnance for the manners of the time ; his assumption of a seeming cynicism ; protests against atheism ; the village soothsayer at Fontainebleau ; two anecdotes of his moral singularity ; revisits Geneva ; end of madame de Warens ; Rousseau's re-conversion to Protestantism ; the religious opinions then current in Geneva ; Turretini and other rationalisers ; effect upon Rousseau ; thinks of taking up his abode in Geneva ; madame d'Epinay offers him the hermitage ; retires thither against the protests of his friends --
VII. The hermitage : distinction between the old and the new anchorite ; Rousseau's first days at the hermitage ; rural delirium ; dislike of society ; meditates work on sensitive morality ; arranges the papers of the abbe de saint Pierre ; his remarks on them ; violent mental crisis ; first conception of the New Heloisa ; a scene of high morals ; Madame d'Houdetot ; erotic mania becomes intensified ; interviews with madame d'Houdetot ; Saint Lambert interposes ; Rousseau's letter to Saint Lambert ; its profound falsity ; Saint Lambert's reply ; final relations with him and with madame d'Houdetot ; sources of Rousseau's irritability ; relations with Diderot ; with madame d'Epinay ; with Grimm ; Grimm's natural want of sympathy with Rousseau ; Madame d'Epinay's journey to Geneva ; occasion of Rousseau's breach with Grimm ; and with madame d'Epinay ; Leaves the hermitage VIII. Music : general character of Rousseau's aim in music ; as composer ; contest on the comparative merits of French and Italian music ; Rousseau's letter on French music ; his scheme of musical notation ; its chief element ; its practical value ; his mistake ; two minor objections --
IX. Voltaire and D'Alembert : position of Voltaire ; general differences between him and Rousseau ; Rousseau not the profounder of the two ; but he had a spiritual element ; their early relations ; Voltair's poem on the earthquake of Lisbon ; Rousseau's wonder that he should have written it ; his letter to Voltaire upon it ; points to the advantages of the savage state ; reproduces pope's general position ; not an answer to the position taken by Voltaire ; Rousseau's circle of bad reasoning ; confesses the question insoluble, but still argues ; curious close of the letter ; their subsequent relations ; D'Alembert's article on Geneva ; the church and the theatre ; Jeremy Collier: Bossuet ; Rousseau's contention on stage-plays ; rude handling of commonplace ; the true answer to Rousseau as to theory of dramatic morality ; his arguments relatively to Geneva ; their meaning ; criticism on the Misanthrope ; Rousseau's contrast between Paris and an imaginary Geneva ; attack on love as a poetic theme ; this letter, the mark of his schism form the party of the philosophers. Vol 2 : X. Montmorency --
the New Heloisa : conditions preceding the composition of the New Heloisa ; the duke and duchess of Luxembourg ; Rousseau and his patrician acquaintances ; peaceful life at Montmorency ; Equivocal prudence occasionally shown by Rousseau ; his want of gratitude for commonplace service ; bad health, and thoughts of suicide ; episode of madame Latour de Franqueville ; relation of the New Heloisa to Rousseau's general doctrine ; action of the first part of the story ; contrasted with contemporary literature ; and with contemporary manners ; criticism of the language and principal actors ; popularity of the New Heloisa ; its reactionary intellectual direction ; action of the second part ; its influence on Goethe and others ; distinction between Rousseau and his school ; singular pictures of domesticity ; sumptuary details ; the slowness of movement in the work, justified ; exaltation of marriage ; equalitarian tendencies ; not inconsistent with social quietism ; compensation in the political consequences of the triumph of sentiment ; circumstances of the publication of the New Heloisa ; nature of the trade in books ; Malesherbes and the printing of Emilius ; Rousseau's suspicions ; the great struggle of the moment ; proscription of Emilius ; flight of the author XI. Persecution : Rousseau's journey from Switzerland ; absence of vindictiveness ; arrival at Yverdun ; repairs to Motiers ; relations with Frederick the Great ; life at Motiers ; Lord Marischal ; Voltaire ; Rousseau's letter to the archbishop of Paris ; its dialectic ; the ministers of Neuchatel ; His singular costume ; his throng of visitors ; Lewis, prince of Wurtember ; Gibbon ; Boswell ; Corsican affairs ; the feud at Geneva ; Rousseau renounces his citizenship ; the letters from the mountain ; their theological side ; political side ; consequent persecutions at Montiers ; flight to the isle of St. Peter ; the fifth of the Reveries ; Proscription by the government of Berne ; Rousseau's singular request ; his renewed flight ; persuaded to seek shelter in England --
XII. The social contract : Rousseau's reaction against perfectibility ; abandonment of the position of the discourses ; doubtful idea of equality ; the social contract, a repudiation of the historic method ; yet it has glimpses of relativity ; influence of Greek examples ; and of Geneva ; impression upon Robespeirre and Saint just ; Rousseau's schemes implied a small territory ; why the social contract made fanatics ; verbal quality of its propositions ; the doctrine of the sovereignty of peoples ; its early phases ; its history in the sixteenth century ; Hooker and Grotius ; Locke ; Hobbes ; central propositions of the social contract: ; 1. origin of society in compact ; different conception held by the physiocrats ; 2. sovereignty of the body thus constituted ; difference from Hobbes and Locke ; the root of socialism ; republican phraseology ; 3. attributes of sovereignty ; 4. the law-making power ; a contemporary illustration ; hints of confederation ; 5. forms of government ; criticism on the common division ; Rousseau's preference for elective aristocracy ; 6. attitude of the state to religion ; Rousseau's view, the climax of a reaction ; its effect at the French Revolution ; Its futility ; another method of approaching the philosophy of government ; origin of society not a compact ; the true reason of the submission of a minority to a majority ; Rousseau fails to touch actual problems ; the doctrine of resistance, for instance ; historical illustrations ; historical effect of the social contract in France and Germany ; socialist deduction from it XIII. Emilius : Rousseau touched by the enthusiasm of his time ; contemporary excitement as to education, part of the revival of naturalism ; Locke on education ; difference between him and Rousseau ; exhortations to mothers ; importance of infantile habits ; Rousseau's protest against reasoning with children ; criticized ; the opposite theory ; the idea of property ; artificially contrived incidents ; Rousseau's omission of the principle of authority ; connected with his neglect of the faculty of sympathy ; Rousseau's ideal of living ; the training that follows from it ; the duty of knowing a craft ; social conception involved in this moral conception ; three aims before the instructor ; Rousseau's omission of training for the social conscience ; no contemplation of society as a whole ; personal interest, the foundation of the morality of Emilius ; the sphere and definition of the social conscience ; the study of history ; Rousseau's notions upon the subject ; Ideals of life for women ; Rousseau's repudiation of his own principles ; his oriental and obscurantist position ; arising from him want of faith in improvement ; his reactionary tendencies in this region eventually neutralized ; sum of the merits of Emilius ; its influence in France and Germany ; in England XIV. The Savoyard Vicar : shallow hopes entertained by the dogmatic atheists ; the good side of the religious reaction ; its preservation of some parts of Christian influence ; earlier forms of deism ; the deism of the Savoyard Vicar ; the elevation of man, as well as the restoration of a divinity ; a divinity for fair weather ; religious self-denial ; the Savoyard Vicar's vital omission ; his position towards Christianity ; its effectiveness as a solvent ; weakness of the subjective test ; subordination of reason to devout emotion, not tenable ; the Savoyard Vicar's deism not compatible with growing intellectual conviction ; the true satisfaction of the religious emotion --
XV. England : Rousseau's English portrait ; his reception in Paris ; and in London ; Hume's account of him ; Settlement at Wootton ; the quarrel with Hume ; Walpole's pretended letter from Frederick ; Baselessness of the whole delusion ; Hume's conduct in the quarrel ; the war of pamphlets ; common theory of Rousseau's madness ; Preparatory conditions ; Extension of disorder from the affective life to the intelligence ; the confessions ; his life at Wootton ; flight from Derbyshire ; and from England --
XVI. The end : the elder Mirabeau ; shelters Rousseau at Fleury ; Rousseau at Trye ; in Dauphiny ; return to Paris ; the Reveries ; life in Paris ; Bernardin de Saint Pierre's account of him ; an Easter excursion ; Rousseau's unsociality ; Poland and Spain ; withdrawal to Ermenonville ; his death.
Responsibility: by John Morley.

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