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Russia's wrong direction : what the United States can and should do

Author: John Edwards; Jack Kemp; Stephen Sestanovich; Council on Foreign Relations.
Publisher: New York, NY : Council on Foreign Relations, ©2006.
Series: Independent task force report, no. 57.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The United States has generally enjoyed good relations with Russia since the dissolution of the Soviet Union fifteen years ago. Washington, Moscow, and the world have benefited from this cooperation on issues ranging from weapons proliferation to counterterrorism after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. In recent years, however, particularly during the second term of Russian President Vladimir Putin,  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: John Edwards; Jack Kemp; Stephen Sestanovich; Council on Foreign Relations.
OCLC Number: 71805930
Notes: Title from PDF file (viewed on June 1, 2006).
Description: 1 electronic text (104 p.) : PDF, 1 map.
Details: Mode of access: World Wide Web.; System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader.
Contents: Introduction and overview --
Russia's social and economic transformation ... --
... And "de-democratization" --
U.S.-Russian relations today --
Findings 1 : partnership, selective cooperation, or ...? --
Findings 2 : democracy and integration --
Recommendations 1 : security --
Recommendations 2 : energy, trade, and environmental cooperation --
Recommendations 3 : dealing with an authoritarian Russia --
Conclusion.
Series Title: Independent task force report, no. 57.
Responsibility: John Edwards and Jack Kemp, chairs ; Stephen Sestanovich, project director.

Abstract:

The United States has generally enjoyed good relations with Russia since the dissolution of the Soviet Union fifteen years ago. Washington, Moscow, and the world have benefited from this cooperation on issues ranging from weapons proliferation to counterterrorism after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. In recent years, however, particularly during the second term of Russian President Vladimir Putin, Russian society and foreign policy have continued to change in ways that raise questions and cause problems for the United States. The Council on Foreign Relations established an Independent Task Force in the spring of 2005 to take stock of developments in Russia, assess the U.S.-Russian relationship, and offer a broad strategy and a set of recommendations for U.S. policymakers in light of these developments.

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