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Safe among the Germans : liberated Jews after World War II

Verfasser/in: Ruth Gay
Verlag: New Haven : Yale University Press, ©2002.
Ausgabe/Format   Buch : EnglischAlle Ausgaben und Formate anzeigen
Datenbank:WorldCat
Zusammenfassung:
"This book tells the story of why a quarter-million Jews, survivors of death camps and forced labor, sought refuge in Germany after World War II. Those who had ventured to return to Poland after liberation soon found that their homeland had become a new killing ground where some 1,500 Jews were murdered in pogroms between 1945 and 1947. Facing death at home, and with Palestine and the rest of the world largely  Weiterlesen…
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Gattung/Form: History
Medientyp: Internetquelle
Dokumenttyp: Buch, Internet-Ressource
Alle Autoren: Ruth Gay
ISBN: 0300092717 9780300092714
OCLC-Nummer: 48557498
Beschreibung: xiv, 347 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Inhalt: Introduction --
1. Where They Came From --
2. Return to the World --
3. The Last German Jews --
4. Jews Again in Berlin: The Gemeinde, the Camps --
5. Jews in East Berlin --
6. New Generations in Germany --
Notes --
Acknowledgments --
Index
Verfasserangabe: Ruth Gay.
Weitere Informationen:

Abstract:

"This book tells the story of why a quarter-million Jews, survivors of death camps and forced labor, sought refuge in Germany after World War II. Those who had ventured to return to Poland after liberation soon found that their homeland had become a new killing ground where some 1,500 Jews were murdered in pogroms between 1945 and 1947. Facing death at home, and with Palestine and the rest of the world largely closed to them, they looked for a place to be safe and found it in the shelter of the Allied Occupation Forces in Germany." "Bottled up for the next three years in displaced persons camps, they created the most poignant - and the last - episode of Yiddish-speaking culture: a final incandescent moment that played itself out on German soil. When the camps emptied in 1948 after the establishment of Israel and with special legislation in the United States, the Jews dispersed. But the loss of their center meant the end of a thousand years of Eastern European Jewish culture." By 1950 a little community of 20,000 Jews remained in Germany: 8,000 native German Jews and 12,000 from Eastern Europe. Ruth Gay's enthralling account tells of their contrasting lives in the two postwar Germanies. After the fall of Communism, the Jewish community was suddenly overwhelmed by tens of thousands of former Soviet Jews. Now there are some 100,000 Jews in Germany. The old, somewhat nostalgic life of the first postwar decades is being swept aside by radical forces from the Lubavitcher at one end to Reform and feminism at the other. What started in 1945 as a "remnant" community has become a dynamic new center of Jewish life.

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