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Sailing the wine-dark sea : why the Greeks matter

Author: Thomas Cahill
Publisher: New York : Nan A. Talese/Doubleday, ©2003.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea, his latest bestselling work of popular history, Thomas Cahill escorts the reader on another entertaining-and historically unassailable-journey through the landmarks of art and bloodshed that defined Greek culture nearly three millennia ago. In ancient Greece, honors could be won in making love and war, and lives were rife with contradictions. By developing the alphabet, the Greeks  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Cahill, Thomas.
Sailing the wine-dark sea.
New York : Nan A. Talese/Doubleday, c2003
(OCoLC)607058275
Online version:
Cahill, Thomas.
Sailing the wine-dark sea.
New York : Nan A. Talese/Doubleday, c2003
(OCoLC)629799973
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Cahill
ISBN: 0385495536 9780385495530
OCLC Number: 52374121
Description: xiv, 304 p., [32] p. of plates : ill. ; 22 cm.
Contents: Introduction : the way they came --
I. The warrior : how to fight --
II. The wanderer : how to feel --
III. The poet : how to party --
IV. The politician and the playwright : how to rule --
V. The philosopher : how to think --
VI. The artist : how to see --
VII. The way they went : Greco-Roman meets Judeo-Christian
Responsibility: Thomas Cahill.
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Abstract:

"In Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea, his latest bestselling work of popular history, Thomas Cahill escorts the reader on another entertaining-and historically unassailable-journey through the landmarks of art and bloodshed that defined Greek culture nearly three millennia ago. In ancient Greece, honors could be won in making love and war, and lives were rife with contradictions. By developing the alphabet, the Greeks empowered the reader and encouraged civil discussion--yet they kept slaves. The glorious verses of the Iliad suggest that their "bellicose society of gleaming metals and rattling weapons" is not so very distant from more recent campaigns of "shock and awe." And, centuries before Zorba, Greece was a land where music, dance, and wine were essential to the high life. Granting equal time to the sacred and the profane, Cahill rivets our attention to the legacies of an ancient and enduring worldview."

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Linked Data


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