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Say what you really mean! : how women can learn to speak up

Author: Debra Johanyak
Publisher: Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield, [2014]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Most of us claim to value honesty and openness in communication, but we often settle for insincerity and ambiguity. We valiantly try to say what we mean, all the while using words, attitudes, and expressions that sabotage the real message. Results can be frustrating, or even devastating. A recent workplace report claims that 25% of the business sector experience communication problems on the job. The actual  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Debra Johanyak
ISBN: 9781442230057 1442230053
OCLC Number: 883647230
Description: xxi, 133 pages : illustration ; 24 cm
Contents: Introduction : why don't we say what we mean? --
Tell it like it is --
Silence : loud and clear --
Is honesty always best? --
Sense and sensitivity --
His fault/her fault : it started in Eden --
Whining and wheedling --
Breaking bad news --
Signs and signals --
Say less and mean more --
Words on the web --
Conclusion : make it count.
Responsibility: Debra Johanyak.

Abstract:

"Most of us claim to value honesty and openness in communication, but we often settle for insincerity and ambiguity. We valiantly try to say what we mean, all the while using words, attitudes, and expressions that sabotage the real message. Results can be frustrating, or even devastating. A recent workplace report claims that 25% of the business sector experience communication problems on the job. The actual percentage is probably much higher. Most large companies recruiting and hiring employees are looking for effective communication as one of the top three skills, in addition to being a team player and having job expertise. Knowing what to say, as well as how and when to say it, are critical factors in communicating about important issues. Finding the courage to give an honest response can give you a bad case of nerves or insomnia. Yet, keeping quiet or minimizing a message can be potentially problematic. In romantic relationships, avoiding sensitive topics may seem like the right thing to do. But chances are women are lighting the fuse to a cache of fireworks that?s bound to explode sooner or later, ruining any chance of a truly meaningful relationship ... Say What you Mean! How Women Can Learn to Speak Up offers hope for improving personal and professional communication for those who struggle to find the right words"--Amazon.com.

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Johanyak covers well-trod ground in this earnest career guide. Seeking to convey stronger and more effective ways of communicating to improve romantic, familial, and professional relationships, Read more...

 
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