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The scientific papers of James Clerk Maxwell

Author: James Clerk Maxwell; W D Niven, Sir
Publisher: New York : Dover Publications, 1965, ©1890.
Edition/Format:   Book : Essay : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Genre/Form: Collections
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Maxwell, James Clerk, 1831-1879.
Scientific papers of James Clerk Maxwell.
New York, Dover Publications [1965, ©1890]
(OCoLC)756457384
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: James Clerk Maxwell; W D Niven, Sir
OCLC Number: 530581
Notes: Includes index.
Description: 2 volumes in 1 : illustrations ; 21 cm
Contents: vol. I. On the description of oval curves and those having a plurality of foci; with remarks by Professor Forbes --
On the theory of rolling curves --
On the equilibrium of elastic solids --
On the transformation of surfaces by bending --
On a particular case of the decent of a heavy body in a resisting medium --
On the theory of colours in relation to colour-blindness --
Experiments on colour as perceived by the eye, with remarks on colour-blindness --
On Faraday's lines of force --
Description of a new form of the platometer, an instrument for measuring the areas of plane figures drawn on paper --
On the elementary theory of optical instruments --
On a method of drawing the theoretical forms of Faraday's lines of force without calculation --
On the unequal sensibility of the Foramen centrale to light of different colours --
On the theory of compound colours with reference to mixtures of blue and yellow light --
On an instrument to illustrate Poinsot's theory of rotation --
On a dynamical top, for exhibiting the phenomena of the motions of a body of invariable form about a fixed point, with some suggestions as to the earth's motion --
Account of experiments on the perception of colour --
On the general laws of optical instruments --
On theories of the constitution of Saturn's rings --
On the stability of the motion of Saturn's rings --
Illustrations of the dynamical theory of gases --
On the theory of compound colours and the relations of the colours of the spectrum --
On the theory of three primary colours --
On physical lines of force --
On reciprocal figures and diagrams of forces --
A dynamical theory of the electromagnetic field --
On the calculation of the equilibrium and stiffness of frames. vol. II. On the viscosity of internal friction of air and other gases (The Bakerian lecture) --
On the dynamical theory of gases --
On the theory of the maintenance of electric currents by mechanical work without the use of permanent magnets --
On the equilibrium of a spherical envelope --
Ont he best arrangement for producing a pure spectrum on a screen --
The construction of stereograms of surfaces --
On reciprocal diagrams in space and their relation to Airy's function of stress --
On governors --
"Experiment in magneto-electric induction" (in a letter to W.R. Grove, F.R.S.) --
On a method of making a direct comparison of electrostatic with electro-magnetic force; with a note on the electromagnetic theory of light --
On the cyclide --
On a bow seen on the surface of ice --
On reciprocal figures, frames, and diagrams of forces --
On the displacement in a case of fluid motion --
Address to the mathematical and physical sections of the British Association (1870) --
On colour-vision at different points of the retina --
On hills and dales --
Introductory lecture on experimental physics --
On the solution of electrical problems by the transformation of conjugate functions --
On the mathematical classification of physical quantities --
On colour vision --
On the geometrical mean distance of two figures on a plane --
On the induction of electric currents in an infinite plane sheet of uniform conductivity --
On the condition that, in the transformation of any figure by curvilinear co-ordinates in three dimensions, every angle in the new figure shall be equal to the corresponding angle in the original figure --
Reprint of papers on electrostatics and magnetism / by Sir W. Thomson (review) --
On the proof of the equations of motion of a connected system --
On a problem in the calculus of variations in which the solution is discontinuous --
On action at a distance --
Elements of natural philosophy / by Professors Sir W. Thomson and P.G. Tait (review) --
On the theory of a system of electrified conductors, and other physical theories involving homogeneous quadratic functions --
On the focal lines of a refracted pencil --
An essay on the mathematical principles of physics / by the Rev. James Challis, M.A. &c. (review) --
On Loschmidt's experiments on diffusion in relation to the kinetic theory of gases --
On the final state of a system of molecules in motion subject to forces of any kind --
Faraday --
Molecules (a lecture) --
On double refraction in a viscous fluid in motion --
On Hamilton's characteristic function for a narrow beam of light --
On the relation of geometrical optics to other parts of mathematics and physics --
Plateau on soap-bubbles (review) --
Grove's "correlation of physical forces" (review) --
On the application of Kirchhoff's rules for electric circuits to the solution of a geometrical problem --
Van der Waals on the continuity of the gaseous and liuid states --
On the centre of motion of the eye --
On the dynamical evidence of the molecular constitution of bodies (a lecture) --
On the application of Hamilton's characteristic funciton to the theory of an otpical instrument symmetrical about its axis --
Atom --
Attraction --
On Bow's method of drawing diagrams in graphical statics with illustrations from Peaucellier's linkage --
On the equilibrium of heterogeneous substances --
Diffusion of gases through absorbing substances --
General considerations concerning scientific apparatus --
Instruments connected with fluids --
Whewell's writings and correspondence (review) --
On Ohm's law --
On the protection of buildings form lightning --
Capillary action --
Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand Helmholtz --
On a paradox in the theory of attraction --
On approximate multiple integration between limits by summation --
On the unpublished electrical papers of the Hon. Henry Cavendish --
Constitution of bodies --
Diffusion --
Diagrams --
Tait's thermodynamics (review) --
On the electrical capacity of a long narrow cylinder and of a disk of sensible thickness --
On stresses in rarified gases arising from inequalities of temperature --
On Boltzmann's theorem on the average distributuion of energy in a system of material points --
The telephone (Rede lecture) --
Paradoxical philosophy (a review) --
Ether --
Thomson and Tait's natural philosophy (a review) --
Faraday --
Reports on special brances of science --
Harmonic analysis.
Responsibility: edited by W.D. Niven.

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schema:description"vol. I. On the description of oval curves and those having a plurality of foci; with remarks by Professor Forbes -- On the theory of rolling curves -- On the equilibrium of elastic solids -- On the transformation of surfaces by bending -- On a particular case of the decent of a heavy body in a resisting medium -- On the theory of colours in relation to colour-blindness -- Experiments on colour as perceived by the eye, with remarks on colour-blindness -- On Faraday's lines of force -- Description of a new form of the platometer, an instrument for measuring the areas of plane figures drawn on paper -- On the elementary theory of optical instruments -- On a method of drawing the theoretical forms of Faraday's lines of force without calculation -- On the unequal sensibility of the Foramen centrale to light of different colours -- On the theory of compound colours with reference to mixtures of blue and yellow light -- On an instrument to illustrate Poinsot's theory of rotation -- On a dynamical top, for exhibiting the phenomena of the motions of a body of invariable form about a fixed point, with some suggestions as to the earth's motion -- Account of experiments on the perception of colour -- On the general laws of optical instruments -- On theories of the constitution of Saturn's rings -- On the stability of the motion of Saturn's rings -- Illustrations of the dynamical theory of gases -- On the theory of compound colours and the relations of the colours of the spectrum -- On the theory of three primary colours -- On physical lines of force -- On reciprocal figures and diagrams of forces -- A dynamical theory of the electromagnetic field -- On the calculation of the equilibrium and stiffness of frames."@en
schema:description"vol. II. On the viscosity of internal friction of air and other gases (The Bakerian lecture) -- On the dynamical theory of gases -- On the theory of the maintenance of electric currents by mechanical work without the use of permanent magnets -- On the equilibrium of a spherical envelope -- Ont he best arrangement for producing a pure spectrum on a screen -- The construction of stereograms of surfaces -- On reciprocal diagrams in space and their relation to Airy's function of stress -- On governors -- "Experiment in magneto-electric induction" (in a letter to W.R. Grove, F.R.S.) -- On a method of making a direct comparison of electrostatic with electro-magnetic force; with a note on the electromagnetic theory of light -- On the cyclide -- On a bow seen on the surface of ice -- On reciprocal figures, frames, and diagrams of forces -- On the displacement in a case of fluid motion -- Address to the mathematical and physical sections of the British Association (1870) -- On colour-vision at different points of the retina -- On hills and dales -- Introductory lecture on experimental physics -- On the solution of electrical problems by the transformation of conjugate functions -- On the mathematical classification of physical quantities -- On colour vision -- On the geometrical mean distance of two figures on a plane -- On the induction of electric currents in an infinite plane sheet of uniform conductivity -- On the condition that, in the transformation of any figure by curvilinear co-ordinates in three dimensions, every angle in the new figure shall be equal to the corresponding angle in the original figure -- Reprint of papers on electrostatics and magnetism / by Sir W. Thomson (review) -- On the proof of the equations of motion of a connected system -- On a problem in the calculus of variations in which the solution is discontinuous -- On action at a distance -- Elements of natural philosophy / by Professors Sir W. Thomson and P.G. Tait (review) -- On the theory of a system of electrified conductors, and other physical theories involving homogeneous quadratic functions -- On the focal lines of a refracted pencil -- An essay on the mathematical principles of physics / by the Rev. James Challis, M.A. &c. (review) -- On Loschmidt's experiments on diffusion in relation to the kinetic theory of gases -- On the final state of a system of molecules in motion subject to forces of any kind -- Faraday -- Molecules (a lecture) -- On double refraction in a viscous fluid in motion -- On Hamilton's characteristic function for a narrow beam of light -- On the relation of geometrical optics to other parts of mathematics and physics -- Plateau on soap-bubbles (review) -- Grove's "correlation of physical forces" (review) -- On the application of Kirchhoff's rules for electric circuits to the solution of a geometrical problem -- Van der Waals on the continuity of the gaseous and liuid states -- On the centre of motion of the eye -- On the dynamical evidence of the molecular constitution of bodies (a lecture) -- On the application of Hamilton's characteristic funciton to the theory of an otpical instrument symmetrical about its axis -- Atom -- Attraction -- On Bow's method of drawing diagrams in graphical statics with illustrations from Peaucellier's linkage -- On the equilibrium of heterogeneous substances -- Diffusion of gases through absorbing substances -- General considerations concerning scientific apparatus -- Instruments connected with fluids -- Whewell's writings and correspondence (review) -- On Ohm's law -- On the protection of buildings form lightning -- Capillary action -- Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand Helmholtz -- On a paradox in the theory of attraction -- On approximate multiple integration between limits by summation -- On the unpublished electrical papers of the Hon. Henry Cavendish -- Constitution of bodies -- Diffusion -- Diagrams -- Tait's thermodynamics (review) -- On the electrical capacity of a long narrow cylinder and of a disk of sensible thickness -- On stresses in rarified gases arising from inequalities of temperature -- On Boltzmann's theorem on the average distributuion of energy in a system of material points -- The telephone (Rede lecture) -- Paradoxical philosophy (a review) -- Ether -- Thomson and Tait's natural philosophy (a review) -- Faraday -- Reports on special brances of science -- Harmonic analysis."@en
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