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Second space : new poems

Author: Czesław Miłosz
Publisher: New York, NY : Ecco, ©2004.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Nobel Laureate Czeslaw Milosz's most recent collection Second Space marks a new stage in one of the great poetic pilgrimages of our time. Few poets have inhabited the land of old age as long or energetically as Milosz, for whom this territory holds both openings and closings, affirmations as well as losses. 'Not soon, as late as the approach of my ninetieth year, / I felt a door opening in me and I entered / the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Translations into English
Named Person: Czesław Miłosz
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Czesław Miłosz
ISBN: 0060745665 9780060745660
OCLC Number: 54694724
Description: 102 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Second space --
Late ripeness --
If there is no God --
In Krakow --
Framing --
Werki --
Advantage --
A master of my craft --
A stay --
On old women --
Classmate --
Tenant --
Guardian angel --
A beautiful stranger --
To spite nature --
I should now --
High terraces --
Nonadaptation --
Hear me --
Scientists --
Merchants --
Coffer --
I --
Degradation --
New age --
Eyes --
Notebook --
Many-tiered man --
Father Severinus --
Treatise on theology --Apprentice --
Orpheus and Eurydice.
Other Titles: Poems.
Responsibility: Czesław Miłosz ; translated by the author and Robert Hass.
More information:

Abstract:

"Nobel Laureate Czeslaw Milosz's most recent collection Second Space marks a new stage in one of the great poetic pilgrimages of our time. Few poets have inhabited the land of old age as long or energetically as Milosz, for whom this territory holds both openings and closings, affirmations as well as losses. 'Not soon, as late as the approach of my ninetieth year, / I felt a door opening in me and I entered / the clarity of early morning,' he writes in 'Late Ripeness.' Elsewhere he laments the loss of his voracious vision - 'My wondrously quick eyes, you saw many things, / Lands and cities, islands and oceans'--only to discover a new light that defies the limits of physical sight: 'Without eyes, my gaze is fixed on one bright point, / That grows large and takes me in.' Second Space is typically capacious in the range of voices, forms, and subjects it embraces. It moves seamlessly from dramatic monologues to theological treatises, from philosophy and history to epigrams, elegies, and metaphysical meditations. It is unified by Milosz's ongoing quest to find the bond linking the things of this world with the order of a 'second space,' shaped not by necessity, but grace. Second Space invites us to accompany a self-proclaimed 'apprentice' on this extraordinary quest. In 'Treatise on Theology,' Milosz calls himself 'a one day's master.' He is, of course, far more than this. Second Space reveals an artist peerless both in his capacity to confront the world's suffering and in his eagerness to embrace its joys: 'Sun. And sky. And in the sky white clouds. / Only now everything cried to him: Eurydice! / How will I live without you, my consoling one! / But there was a fragrant scent of herbs, the low humming of bees, / And he fell asleep with his cheek on the sun-warmed earth.'"--Book jacket.

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schema:reviewBody""Nobel Laureate Czeslaw Milosz's most recent collection Second Space marks a new stage in one of the great poetic pilgrimages of our time. Few poets have inhabited the land of old age as long or energetically as Milosz, for whom this territory holds both openings and closings, affirmations as well as losses. 'Not soon, as late as the approach of my ninetieth year, / I felt a door opening in me and I entered / the clarity of early morning,' he writes in 'Late Ripeness.' Elsewhere he laments the loss of his voracious vision - 'My wondrously quick eyes, you saw many things, / Lands and cities, islands and oceans'--only to discover a new light that defies the limits of physical sight: 'Without eyes, my gaze is fixed on one bright point, / That grows large and takes me in.' Second Space is typically capacious in the range of voices, forms, and subjects it embraces. It moves seamlessly from dramatic monologues to theological treatises, from philosophy and history to epigrams, elegies, and metaphysical meditations. It is unified by Milosz's ongoing quest to find the bond linking the things of this world with the order of a 'second space,' shaped not by necessity, but grace. Second Space invites us to accompany a self-proclaimed 'apprentice' on this extraordinary quest. In 'Treatise on Theology,' Milosz calls himself 'a one day's master.' He is, of course, far more than this. Second Space reveals an artist peerless both in his capacity to confront the world's suffering and in his eagerness to embrace its joys: 'Sun. And sky. And in the sky white clouds. / Only now everything cried to him: Eurydice! / How will I live without you, my consoling one! / But there was a fragrant scent of herbs, the low humming of bees, / And he fell asleep with his cheek on the sun-warmed earth.'"--Book jacket."
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