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The second stage

Author: Betty Friedan
Publisher: New York : Summit Books, ©1981.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Warning the women's movement against dissolving into factionalism, male-bashing, and preoccupation with sexual and identity politics rather than bottom-line political and economic inequalities, Friedan argues that once past the initial phases of describing and working against political and economic injustices, the women's movement should focus on working with men to remake private and public arrangements that work  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Friedan, Betty.
Second stage.
New York : Summit Books, ©1981
(OCoLC)655132641
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Betty Friedan
ISBN: 0671410342 9780671410346 0671459511 9780671459512
OCLC Number: 7717510
Description: 344 pages ; 22 cm
Contents: End of the beginning --
The half-life of reaction --
The family as new feminist frontier --
The quiet movement of American men --
Reality test at West Point --
The second stage --
The limits and true potential of women's power --
The new mode --
Take back the day --
The house and the dream --
Human sex and human politics.
Responsibility: Betty Friedan.

Abstract:

Warning the women's movement against dissolving into factionalism, male-bashing, and preoccupation with sexual and identity politics rather than bottom-line political and economic inequalities, Friedan argues that once past the initial phases of describing and working against political and economic injustices, the women's movement should focus on working with men to remake private and public arrangements that work against full lives with children for women and men both. Friedan's agenda to preserve families is far more radical than it appears, for she argues that a truly equitable preservation of marriage and family may require a reorganization of many aspects of conventional middle-class life, from the greater use of flex time and job-sharing, to company-sponsored daycare, to new home designs to permit communal housekeeping and cooking arrangements.

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