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Seismic modeling at 14 gigaflops on the Connection Machine

Author: Jacek Myczkowski; Guy Steele
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Thinking Machines Corp., [1991?]
Series: Technical report series (Thinking Machines Corporation), TMC- 198.
Edition/Format:   Book : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Abstract: "Seismic modeling represents a difficult numerical challenge and consumes a significant amount of CPU time on the largest available supercomputers. With the advent of massively-parallel supercomputers, there is a possibility of drastically reducing the execution time for some of these codes. Many of the algorithms used in seismic modeling use explicit numerical methods on regular structured grids. Because
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Jacek Myczkowski; Guy Steele
OCLC Number: 25929366
Notes: Cover title.
Description: 17 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm.
Series Title: Technical report series (Thinking Machines Corporation), TMC- 198.
Responsibility: J. Myczkowski, G. Steele.

Abstract:

Abstract: "Seismic modeling represents a difficult numerical challenge and consumes a significant amount of CPU time on the largest available supercomputers. With the advent of massively-parallel supercomputers, there is a possibility of drastically reducing the execution time for some of these codes. Many of the algorithms used in seismic modeling use explicit numerical methods on regular structured grids. Because of the regularity of the interconnections and the locality of the calculations, those types of problems usually map well onto massively parallel computers.

In this paper the acoustic wave equation with sponge boundary conditions will be used as an example to show how to map and optimize an explicit finite difference algorithm onto a massively parallel machine. This algorithm is part of a seismic modeling code developed by Mobil Research and Thinking Machines to run on a CM-2 Connection Machine. This program achieved a sustained performance of 14.1 billion numerical operations per second (14.1 Gigaflops) including I/O on a 65536 processor CM-2 supercomputer. In recognition of this performance, this work was awarded the 1989 Gordon Bell Prize [1,2] in the performance category and received an Honorable Mention in the 1990 competition [3].

This yearly prize is given by the editors of the IEEE Software Magazine in recognition of 'outstanding achievements in the application of parallel processing to scientific and engineering problems' with the winning entry 'running faster than any other comparable engineering or scientific application'."

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