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Selected essays and dialogues

Author: Plutarch.
Publisher: Oxford : New York : Oxford University Press, 1993.
Series: World's classics.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This new translation of a selection of Plutarch's miscellaneous works - the Moralia - illustrates his thinking on religious, ethical, social, and political issues. Two genres are represented: the dialogue, which Plutarch wrote in a tradition nearer to Cicero than to Plato, and the informal treatise or essay, in which his personality is most clearly displayed. His diffuse and individual style conveys a character of  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Translations into English
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Plutarch.
Selected essays and dialogues.
Oxford : New York : Oxford University Press, 1993
(OCoLC)623883309
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Plutarch.
ISBN: 0192830945 9780192830944
OCLC Number: 26359455
Description: xxix, 431 pages ; 19 cm.
Series Title: World's classics.
Other Titles: Moralia.
Responsibility: Plutarch.

Abstract:

This new translation of a selection of Plutarch's miscellaneous works - the Moralia - illustrates his thinking on religious, ethical, social, and political issues. Two genres are represented: the dialogue, which Plutarch wrote in a tradition nearer to Cicero than to Plato, and the informal treatise or essay, in which his personality is most clearly displayed. His diffuse and individual style conveys a character of great charm and authority. Plutarch's works have been admired and imitated in Western literature since the Renaissance. Montaigne, who read Amyot's translation, considered Plutarch's Moralia to be a 'breviary', a book without which 'we ignorant folk would have been lost'. For Ralph Waldo Emerson it was a favourite bedside book, and an inspiration: 'a poet might rhyme all day with hints drawn from Plutarch, page on page.'.
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