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The Semantic Web : semantics for data and services on the Web

Author: Vipul Kashyap; Christoph Bussler; Matthew Moran
Publisher: Berlin : Springer, ©2008.
Series: Data-centric systems and applications.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The Semantic Web is a vision - the idea of having data on the Web defined and linked in such a way that it can be used by machines not just for display purposes but for automation, integration and reuse of data across various applications. Technically, however, there is a widespread misconception that the Semantic Web is primarily a rehash of existing A1 and database work focused on encoding knowledge  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Vipul Kashyap; Christoph Bussler; Matthew Moran
ISBN: 3540764518 9783540764519
OCLC Number: 191760023
Description: xv, 414 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
Contents: 1.1 Motivation: Why Semantic Web? 4 --
1.2 A Framework for Semantic Web 5 --
1.3 Use Case: Translational Medicine Clinical Vignette 7 --
1.4 Scope and Organization 9 --
2 Use Case and Functional Requirements 11 --
2.1 Detailed Clinical Use Case 12 --
2.2 Stakeholders and Information Needs 13 --
2.3 Conceptual Architecture 15 --
2.4 Functional Requirements 17 --
2.5 Research Issues 18 --
Part II Information Aspects of the Semantic Web 21 --
3 Semantic Web Content 23 --
3.1 Nature of Web Content 23 --
3.2 Nature of Semantic Web Content 24 --
3.3 Metadata 25 --
3.3.1 Metadata Usage in Various Applications 26 --
3.3.2 Metadata: A Tool for Describing and Modeling Information 27 --
3.4 Ontologies: Vocabularies and Reference Terms for Metadata 30 --
4 Metadata Frameworks 35 --
4.1 Examples of Metadata Frameworks 35 --
4.1.1 XML-Based Metadata Framework 36 --
4.1.2 RDF-Based Metadata Framework 36 --
4.1.3 OWL-Based Metadata Framework 37 --
4.1.4 WSMO-Based Metadata Framework 37 --
4.2 Two Perspectives: Data Models and Model-Theoretic Semantics 38 --
4.2.1 Data Models 38 --
4.2.2 Multiple Syntaxes for RDF: A Short Note 47 --
4.2.3 Model-Theoretic Semantics 48 --
4.3 Query Languages 51 --
4.3.1 Query Languages for XML Data 51 --
4.3.2 Query Languages for RDF Data 62 --
4.3.3 Extending Query Languages with Reasoning and Entailment 73 --
4.4 Clinical Scenario Revisited 74 --
4.4.1 Semantic Web Specifications: LIMS and EMR Data 74 --
4.4.2 Linking data from Multiple Data Sources 76 --
4.4.3 Advantages and Disadvantages of using Semantic Web Specifications 78 --
5 Ontologies and Schemas 79 --
5.1 What is an Ontology? 79 --
5.2 Ontology Representation Languages 84 --
5.2.1 XML Schema 84 --
5.2.2 RDF Schema 92 --
5.2.3 Web Ontology Language 100 --
5.2.4 The Web Service Modeling Ontology (WSMO) 112 --
5.2.5 Comparison of Ontology Representation Languages 118 --
5.3 Integration of Ontology and Rule Languages 122 --
5.3.1 Motivation and Requirements 122 --
5.3.2 Overview of Languages and Approaches 123 --
5.3.3 Semantic Web Rules Language 124 --
5.4 Clinical Scenario Revisited 126 --
5.4.1 A Domain Ontology for Translational Medicine 126 --
5.4.2 Integration of Ontologies and Rules for Clinical Decision Support 130 --
5.4.3 Advantages and Disadvantages of using Semantic Web Specifications 135 --
6 Ontology Authoring and Management 137 --
6.1 Ontology Building Tools 137 --
6.1.1 Ontology Editors: Brief Descriptions 138 --
6.1.2 Ontology Editors: A Comparative Evaluation 143 --
6.2 Ontology Bootstrapping Approaches 148 --
6.3 Ontology Merge and Integration Tools 150 --
6.3.1 Ontology Merge and Integration Tools: A Brief Description 151 --
6.3.2 Evaluation of Ontology Merge and Integration Tools 152 --
6.4 Ontology Engines and Reasoners 154 --
6.5 Clinical Scenario Revisited 157 --
7 Applications of Metadata and Ontologies 161 --
7.1 Tools and Techniques for Metadata Annotation 161 --
7.1.1 Requirements for Metadata Annotation 162 --
7.1.2 Tools and Technologies for Metadata Annotation 163 --
7.1.3 Comparative Evaluation 168 --
7.2 Techniques for Schema/Ontology Mapping 173 --
7.2.1 A Classification of Schema-matching Approaches 173 --
7.2.2 Schema-matching Techniques: Overview 179 --
7.3 Ontology Driven Information Integration 183 --
7.3.1 The Role of Ontologies in Information Integration 183 --
7.3.2 Ontology Representations Used in Information Integration 187 --
7.3.3 The Role of Mapping in Information Integration 188 --
7.3.4 The Role of Ontology Engineering in Information Integration 190 --
Part III Process Aspects of the Semantic Web 193 --
8 Communication 195 --
8.1 Communication Concepts 195 --
8.1.1 Fundamental Types 196 --
8.1.2 Formats and Protocols (FAP) 197 --
8.1.3 Separation of Interface and Logic 198 --
8.1.4 Communicating Parties 199 --
8.1.5 Mediation 201 --
8.1.6 Non-functional Aspects 202 --
8.2 Communication Paradigms 203 --
8.2.1 Client/Server (C/S) 204 --
8.2.2 Queueing 204 --
8.2.3 Peer-to-Peer (P2P) 205 --
8.2.4 Blackboard 205 --
8.2.5 Web Services 206 --
8.2.6 Representational State Transfer (REST) 207 --
8.2.7 Agents 207 --
8.2.8 Tuple Spaces 208 --
8.2.9 Co-location 208 --
8.3 Long-Running Communication 209 --
8.3.1 Business-to-Business (B2B) Protocols 210 --
8.3.2 Application-to-Application (A2A) Protocols 211 --
8.4 Web Services 211 --
8.5 Clinical Use Case 212 --
9 State of the Art in Web Services 215 --
9.1 History 215 --
9.2 Traditional Web Services 216 --
9.2.1 WSDL 217 --
9.2.2 SOAP 218 --
9.2.3 UDDI 219 --
9.3 Emerging Web Service Specifications (WS*-Stack) 220 --
9.3.1 Standards 220 --
9.3.2 Web Service Standards 221 --
9.3.3 Semantic-Web-Service-Related Standards 222 --
9.4 Service-oriented Architecture (SOA) 223 --
9.4.1 Service Paradigm 223 --
9.4.2 SOA and Web Services 224 --
9.4.3 Open Issues and Technical Challenges 224 --
9.5 Semantics and Web Services 226 --
9.5.1 Semantics, What Semantics? 227 --
9.5.2 Data Semantics 228 --
9.5.3 Process Semantics 229 --
9.5.4 Selection Semantics 229 --
9.5.5 Other Types of Semantics 230 --
9.6 Clinical Use Case 231 --
10 Web Service Composition 233 --
10.1 Composition 233 --
10.1.1 Motivation 233 --
10.1.2 Definition of Composition 235 --
10.1.3 Web Services and Composition 237 --
10.1.4 Choreography and Orchestration 238 --
10.2 Dynamic Composition 239 --
10.3 Business-to-Business Communication 240 --
10.4 Application-to-Application Communication 241 --
10.5 Complex Business Logic 242 --
10.6 Standards and Technologies 243 --
10.6.1 Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) 244 --
10.6.2 Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) 245 --
10.6.3 Web Service Choreography Description Language (WS-CDL) 245 --
10.6.4 Java Business Integration (JBI) 246 --
10.7 Clinical Use Case 247 --
11 Semantic Web Services 249 --
11.1 Semantics of Web Services 249 --
11.1.1 Why Semantic Web Services? 249 --
11.1.2 Interface vs. Implementation 251 --
11.1.3 Modeling of State 251 --
11.2 Alternatives for Capturing Semantics of Web Services 253 --
11.2.1 Finite State Machines 253 --
11.2.2 Statechart Diagrams 254 --
11.2.3 Petri Nets 254 --
11.2.4 Process Algebras 256 --
11.3 Semantic Web Service Approaches 259 --
11.3.1 OWL-S 259 --
11.3.2 SWSF 261 --
11.3.3 WSDL-S 266 --
11.3.4 SAWSDL 268 --
11.3.5 WSMO, WSML and WSMX 269 --
11.4 Reasoning with Web Service Semantics 276 --
11.4.1 Discovery 276 --
11.4.2 Semantic Web Service Composition 281 --
11.4.3 Mediation 283 --
11.5 Clinical Use Case 285 --
Part IV Standards 287 --
12 Semantic Web Standards 289 --
12.1 Relevant Standards Organization 289 --
12.1.1 International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 289 --
12.1.2 International Electotechnical Commission (IEC) 290 --
12.1.3 Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS) 290 --
12.1.4 World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) 290 --
12.1.5 International Engineering Task Force (IETF) 291 --
12.1.6 National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 291 --
12.1.7 The Object Modeling Group (OMG) 291 --
12.1.8 Semantic Web Services Initiative (SWSI) 292 --
12.1.9 United States National Library of Medicine (NLM) 292 --
12.2 Semantic Web Content Standardization Efforts 293 --
12.2.1 Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) 293 --
12.2.2 eXtensible Markup Language (XML) 293 --
12.2.3 eXtensible Stylesheet Transformation Language (XSLT) 294 --
12.2.4 XPath 294 --
12.2.5 XQuery 294 --
12.2.6 XML Schema 294 --
12.2.7 Resource Description Framework (RDF) 295 --
12.2.8 SPARQL 295 --
12.2.9 RDF Schema 295 --
12.2.10 Web Ontology Language (OWL) 296 --
12.2.11 Rule-ML 296 --
12.2.12 Semantic Web Rules Language (SWRL) 296 --
12.2.13 Ontology Definition Metamodel (ODM) 296 --
12.2.14 Unified Modeling Language (UML) 297 --
12.2.15 Knowledge Interchange Format (KIF) 297 --
12.2.16 Open Knowledge Base Connectivity Protocol (OKBC) 297 --
12.2.17 DIG Description Logics Interface 297 --
12.2.18 OWL API 298 --
12.2.19 Standardized Vocabularies and Ontologies 298 --
12.3 Semantic Web Services Standardization Efforts 300 --
12.3.1 ISO-18629 Process Specification Language (PSL) 301 --
12.3.2 W3C Semantic Annotations for the Web Services Description Language (SAWSDL) 302 --
12.3.3 OWL-S 303 --
12.3.4 Web Services Modeling Ontology (WSMO) 303 --
12.3.5 Semantic Web Services Framework (SWSF) 304 --
12.3.6 WSDL-S 304 --
12.3.7 OASIS Semantic Execution Environment (SEE) 304 --
12.3.8 OASIS Service-Oriented Architecture Reference Model (SOA RM) 305 --
12.3.9 Semantic Web Services Architecture (SWSA) 306 --
12.3.10 Semantic Web Services Interest Group (SWS-IG) 307 --
Part V Putting it All Together and Perspective 309 --
13 A Solution Approach to the Clinical Use Case 311 --
13.1 Service Discovery, Composition and Choreography 312 --
13.1.1 Specification of Clinical Workflow using WSMO 313 --
13.1.2 Data Structures in Data Flow 316 --
13.1.3 Data Mediation 319 --
13.1.4 Goal Definition 328 --
13.1.5 Discovery 331 --
13.1.6 Orchestration/Service Composition 333 --
13.1.7 Process and Protocol Mediation 339 --
13.2 Data and Knowledge Integration 342 --
13.2.1 Data Integration Services: WSMO/WSML Specification 343 --
13.2.2 Semantic Data Integration Architecture 344 --
13.2.3 A Domain Ontology for Translational Medicine 346 --
13.2.4 Use of RDF to represent Genomic and Clinical Data 351.
Series Title: Data-centric systems and applications.
Responsibility: Vipul Kashyap, Christoph Bussler, Matthew Moran.
More information:

Abstract:

The Semantic Web is a vision - the idea of having data on the Web defined and linked in such a way that it can be used by machines not just for display purposes but for automation, integration and  Read more...

Notes:

by lzhhust (WorldCat user on 2008-07-01)

Throughout the book, the use-case of a clinical vignette will serve to motivate and explain solutions based on Semantic Web technologies, emphasizing the application aspects related to data integration, knowledge acquisition, change management, semantic web services, and workflow management. With this textbook, the authors deliver an application-driven state-of-the-art presentation of Semantic Web technologies, ideally suited for academic courses on the Semantic Web and architectures of information systems, and for self-studying professionals engaged in the design and implementation of advanced application systems.

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"Kashyap et al. (...) provide an organized and well-written textbook that can serve as both a theoretical guide and a practical tutorial for the informational and computational aspects of the Read more...

 
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