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Shaking the faith : women, family, and Mary Marshall Dyer's anti-Shaker campaign, 1815-1867

Author: Elizabeth A De Wolfe
Publisher: New York : Palgrave, 2002.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"When Mary Marshall Dyer (1780-1867) joined the Shakers in 1813 with her husband and five children, she thought she had found salvation. But two years later, she fled the sect, calling them subversive of Christian morality and a danger to American society. When her husband and the Shaker authorities denied her request for the return of her children. Dyer joined forces with an aggressive anti-Shaker movement - an  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Named Person: Mary M Dyer; Mary Dyer
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Elizabeth A De Wolfe
ISBN: 0312295030 9780312295035
OCLC Number: 49529941
Description: xiv, 233 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 22 cm.
Contents: Introduction: Shakers and Anti-Shakers --
Conversion, Deconversion and Apostasy --
The Sympathy and Malice of Mankind --
The World Worked Up to Some Purpose --
A Spectacle for Remark --
In Deep Affliction --
Notorious Against Them.
Responsibility: Elizabeth A. De Wolfe.
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Abstract:

Mary Dyer (1780 -1867) was at the centre of an aggressive anti-Shaker movement when her husband and the Shaker authorities kept her five children after Mary left the sect. This title examines the  Read more...

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Winner of the 2003 Outstanding Publication Award, Communal Studies Association "Elizabeth De Wolfe's account of Dyer's circumstances, motives, and activities as a prominent Shaker apostate sheds new Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""When Mary Marshall Dyer (1780-1867) joined the Shakers in 1813 with her husband and five children, she thought she had found salvation. But two years later, she fled the sect, calling them subversive of Christian morality and a danger to American society. When her husband and the Shaker authorities denied her request for the return of her children. Dyer joined forces with an aggressive anti-Shaker movement - an informal yet effective group linked together by their disdain of Shakerism and their determination to thwart the new faith. Distraught, angry, and alone. Dyer turned her anguish into action and embarked on a fifty-year campaign against the Shakers - and was the centerpiece of the Shakers' counterattack. The American public followed the debate with great interest, not least because it offered titillating details into the mysterious sect, but also because Dyer's experiences reflected profound changes in religion, gender, and family in antebellum America. In this study of Dyer and her world. Elizabeth A. De Wolfe suggests that while neither Dyer nor the Shakers would agree, the former, a mother without children and a wife without a husband, and the latter, a celibate communal sect that disavowed the marriage bond, shared similar positions on the margins of antebellum society."--BOOK JACKET."
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